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I find it hilarious that the Dickens tale "A Christmas Carol" is a story supposedly about good will, while being horribly, brazenly anti semitic. It just doesn't get anymore ironic than that. It might as well have been called "the Jew".
NANOHORIZON NANOHORIZON 22-25, M 3 Answers Dec 24, 2012 in Religion

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R U 4 Real. Be more specific.

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Spend a couple minutes thinking about Ebenezer Scrooge.

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I found that the Muppets Christmas Carol was the best way to describe what actually happened. None of the other versions showed exactly why he was such a bitter, lonely old man but in the Muppets movie, it showed exactly why.

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This was written by Charles Dickens in 1943. Charles himself criticizes the Character as being a "sinner". This story has nothing to do with bitterness, loneliness or age, at all. Admitted by the writer himself.

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Hmm.. so...what is it really about then>

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The story was written in 1843 and there is no mention whatsoever of any anti-semitic undertones in this story. Check your facts because I am a Huge Dickens Fan.

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He JUST said that. I was asking him what it was about. Maybe you should read the entire conversation before you start being a smart ***.

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I stated the facts.

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I think the story was sincerely written to focus on good will (in the eyes of the writer) and that it couldn't have been more misplaced.
First of all, it's obvious none of the other characters in the story care what so ever about Ebenezer, they wouldn't have a place telling him what to do in any culture I can think of.
The writer shines through in the narcissism of the Characters. A secondary character speaking to Ebenezer openly and brazenly discounts Ebenezers thoughts, wiches, intentions, and in the same breath expresses dislike of being told how to think and what to do. That's what we call a double standard, and it's a recurring theme throughout the entire story, it IS the story. And that's the point.
This tale is overtly Christian. So? I thought Christians prided themselves on not telling other individuals or groups what to do? What is a book full of Christians doing telling an old jew how to live his life, even if they were right?
It's fairly obvious the writer was ignorant. At the very best they were one of two things- informing the readers of the dishonest nature of Christianity, or they had no idea Christianity is stuffed with hypocrisy in the first place. Notice how neither serve as a worthy excuse for writing "a Christmas Carol" the story about isolating others because they're not like you.
I guess I shouldn't expect much else from Christian literature.

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I think it was well timed from a marketing perspective.

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