I think back then, they didn't think of all the consequencess of advancing kids. Brain and maturity, don't always match up. I wasn't pushed ahead a year...but I was always put in the higher reading or math group in my grade. Even though college. However, I hated it...because I was on the low end of the smart ones and had to work HARD just to keep up with the very smart ones. When I was in the the "regular" reading and math...I was on the high end of that group. I pulled myself out of the higher or advanced in college. I was just lost at that point.

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Yes, I did too: I was put up a year when I started Junior School aged seven, so I skipped what would have been Year 3 (US Second Grade ?) I got some D's and an E+ on my first term's report as I struggled to catch up to the standard the rest of the class were at, but by the end of a year I was back up to As and Bs again.<br />
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From then on, I was always the youngest in the class, often by quite a large margin. It didn't really cause any great problems from what I remember of it. I went to an all-boys secondary school where there was quite a heavy emphasis on academic achievement: I was very shy and extremely timid at school and looking back on it, I daresay that always being the youngest at times made that seem worse. Possibly the only time it became noticeable was when I went into the sixth-form with its greater degree of relative freedom and maturity of approach: I was still only 15. But even then, it just required a bit more adjustment for me than for the other boys I guess.<br />
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I don't have any regrets about it, no. I did really well at school: I left at 17 with three A levels, and have very happy memories of my schooldays.

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