In a way yes, but also no.<br />
If nihilism is defined s the belief that life is without ob<x>jective meaning, purpose, or intrinsic value... then I am a fence sitter.<br />
I don't think life needs to have meaning on a universal level in order to have value. Life wants to live at a cellular level... is it endowed by genetics with will and desire to survive, thrive, seek comfort and procreate... it enjoys pleasure when these desires are being well fulfilled... and there is altruistic pleasure when life strives to provide or facilitate these fulfillments for other life or all life. So life has intrinsic value to itself.<br />
Purpose and meaning can be derived by each individual in his or her own way from this essential value of life for living. All forms of livelihood in some way support life; thus we can find meaning in work if we so choose.<br />
.[1] Moral nihilists assert that morality does not inherently exist, and that any established moral values are abstractly contrived. Nihilism can also take epistemological, metaphysical, or ontological forms, meaning respectively that, in some aspect, knowledge is not possible, or that contrary to popular belief, some aspect of reality does not exist as such.

Best Answer

I'm currently conflicted between nihilism and agnosticism. Depression can turn you into a nihilist. Or maybe nihilism leads to depression? Was thinking about that earlier. If I'd be happier if I believed in some sort of deity.

Best Answer

Yes, which one triggers the other? in my case, if i recall, it was certainly when I first started to loose my faith, and that lead to depression, and then ultimatly, nihilism, and that feeling Sartre described as the "Nausea."

Best Answer

What's the point?

Best Answer