I'm a Scot with Irish ancestry, though I've lived in England as well.<br />
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I don't feel British at all, in fact I don't like the idea of Britain and the union. It has the tendency to put England, and particularly the south and London (not a lot of Americans know England has a north / south divide as well) at the centre of its policy and 'culture'. I support a united Ireland and Scottish / Welsh / Cornish independence.<br />
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About the Irish thing, it's not really between northern Ireland and the republic per say. It's between people who indentify as Irish, Celtic, Catholic, and want a united Ireland, and those who identify as British, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant and want northern Ireland to remain as part of Britain.<br />
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The emnity between the two separate communities still exists. I grew up in the west of Scotland where there a lot of the problems have been carried over - violence, biggotry and prejudice. The reason it still exists is because neither community see the problem as resolved - northern Ireland is still in a sort of limbo between Ireland and Britain. Communities that have been at each other's throats for hundreds of years still live side by side. It's about religion as well as politics, ethnicity, and even things as trivial as football: it's a very complex situation.<br />
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The Commonwealth is an odd one. Most people that felt genuine pride for it would be quite conservative British enthusiasts. It means very little to most everyday Brits, and practically it doesn't really serve much of a purpose beyond ceremony. It doesn't really distinguish between countries we colonised (dominions - such as Australia and Canada) and countries we shat on (like India) which is probably quite misleading as well.

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