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A Lady at the office suffers from MS. (multiple sclerosis) She really battles with everyday things and will often come over for a prayer request, then leave. She struggles to walk and get to work. I'm trying to work out a lift club to include her (being in HR and all). Has anyone had any success with EFT? I don't want to refer her to something that won't help her and give her false hope. SHe's tried so many things.. She is on some medication but really has missed work so much that they want to dismiss her. It would be unfair since it's not her fault so I'm trying to advise management to rather place her in a less stressful role with more flexibility, even if it means re-negotiating the contract for her with her. Shes' so young - late 20s. Any success stories out there I can pass onto her to give some real hope, or is it all just hopeless? She's hopeless but I keep thinking there must be SOME thing..
Wysteria1 Wysteria1 36-40, F 10 Answers Nov 26, 2009

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EFT is a scam that costs lots of money and provides only placebo effect comfort. It is not scientifically accepted or even possible to test scientifically because it is pseudoscience. It lacks falsifiability, relies on anecdotal evidence, and is most aggressive promoted via the Internet credit card scams. Gary Craig, the originator of EFT, has argued that tapping anywhere on the body will manipulate "energy meridians". Skeptics have asserted that such an argument renders EFT untestable by scientific method, and therefore a pseudoscience. Testing of the EFT hypothesis through the use of a placebo group produced the same positive changes in recipients as following the EFT's standard methodology. A 2007 article in the Guardian suggested that the act of tapping parts of the body in a complicated sequence acts as a distraction, and therefore can appear to alleviate the root distress.

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To me it has not worked ever. I tried it many times, but no results. There is much more positive results with mastering energies through conscious meditation, focus, and intention. But since this all EFT experience is ba<x>sed on self suggestion, yes, some people may have success with it. I just would be curious if there was a realistic survey to test this with results. There must be a lot of failures. That is where be careful of "viral " phenomena/internet fads

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I'm not sure how you're defining placebo, but after researching the definition it appears that a placebo effect diminishes over time, a relatively short amount of time at that. Even the American Cancer Society website says, 'Some scientists believe that the effects of many alternative therapies may simply be a placebo effect. If the patient believes in the treatment and wants it to work, it can seem to do so, at least for a while. If this effect worked on an illness that usually would not get better on its own, and it lasted, it would be considered a real cure, not a placebo effect.' I'm thinking in my Sister's case, four years does not a placebo make.

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I have successfully used EFT for many things and have had no recurrence of symptoms for most. If there is a return of symptoms, it's not that EFT didn't work, it's that there are more aspects to address. It is absolutely NOT a scam. <br />
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There are practitioners who charge the same as couselors and psychotherapists, and the EFT results are quicker and long lasting. Medical practices cost even more, and I'm not aware of any "cure" within the medical profession.<br />
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There have been reports of success with EFT and MS, but it's something that an experienced practitioner would need to do, and not self-administered (as many issues can be resolved with EFT). It's not a quick, one session deal, obviously. Even if some of the symptoms were relieved, that would be fantastic. The key is persistence. Do some tapping on your own between EFT sessions. It's about a commitment to yourself. <br />
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Try it if your instincts tell you to. You can find a practitioner on the internet and interview them first. <br />
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I wish you all the best.

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I've read recently an MS article that you may want to peruse. <br />
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http://blogs.healthfreedomalliance.org/blog/2009/11/23/ms-breakthrough-treatment/

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An Italian doctor named Dr. Zamboni has pioneered a new technique called the liberating procedure. There was a show on a Canadian network about it last week. You can google it for more information. The show was W5 on the CTV network.

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I have a MS and trust me, there is nothing that can help us but good doctors, good meds and a good sense of humor.

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EFT has been proven to be "evidence ba<x>sed" according to the APA...you can go to eftuniverse.com...resource tab...EFT in the news...to find the recently published article with the findings that allow EFT to be defined as "evidence ba<x>sed." There are many sc<x>ripts on line and free teleseminars on a regular basis for folks wanting to experience EFT. I do always recommend working with a practitioner to "get the hang of it." Although it is nicely designed for self implementation...It has been used extensively in Rwanda, Newtown Ct, since it can be applied to any mental, emotional, or physical discomfort (often times they are related and so can be addressed together or separately...but be your own judge and look around a bit :) s/lil

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