This is MY opinion, so I want to make this clear.<br />
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Andy Warhol. Here's a guy who did what I did when I was in school; Lithography. People were doing Lithography for business purposes, but good old Andy coined in on it; think of "the great works" of his Campbells Soup Lithographs; those half-way through art studies in College and Uni' were doing much better crafted works, but sadly they weren't artists; not like My Warhol. They are pictures of tins, to my way of thinking, and no amount of 'deep thought' will make me believe anything else. When he resorted to using ladies nipples as paint brushes, then the mind truly boggles. That's my tant over and Mr Warhol I used as a prime example of total uninterest as a 'considered' artist.<br />
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They say beauty is in the eye of the beholder and I would say fair enough to that. But what if even those who admire artists and their 'painful' brush-strokes don't truly *know* what they say they know or see what they say they see. Example ...<br />
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In 1961, Matisse’s Le Bateau had a piece of his work hung in a gallery in NY. Out of the of the 116,000 visitors (many would know this piece well) who had stood and admired his masterpiece "The Boat" *none* of them realised that it was hung upside down for 2 MONTHS before it was discovered to be wrongly hung.<br />
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When I understand with my *eyes* I can associate with the work because my eyes figure it out. When I look at a couple of hundred house-bricks lying on the floor to emulate a wall, that's what I see ... I see a guy who built a wall on the floor. What else am I supposed to see? More to the point ... what on earth did the guy see who wrongly built a wall on the floor? Makes one think ... uh? :-)<br />
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(Good question)<br />
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;-)<br />
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~F~

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You make a compelling argument. I guess you can dress up a turd in tinfoil and someone will buy it (and they probably have). In a strange way it appears to be no different than the stock market - people will pay what they think something is worth, and as such value is dependent on your personal interpretation of it.

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Yes, art is highly subjective. A guy who draws a square in the middle of the canvass, then paints it red is said to be an artist, but *only* because he is already established as one. It's this which totally baffles me (and there is such a painting, by the way) Thank you so much for BA on this; it's a topic I've been involved in a number of times and I find the *views* of the topic more an art form than the topic itself. Again, thank you ~F~

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So I had to look up Matisse’s Le Bateau The Boat ... And for those here that want to see it too...here you go...
http://allaboutcarmen.blogspot.com/2008/08/matisses-le-bateau.html
Guess it boils down to beauty is in the eyes of the beholder but it is crazy the $ people will spend on something just because of who it is painted by etc. Sort of like paying for Calvin Klien jeans when most all jeans last for what seems like years and can be just as stylish.

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I'm glad that you took a look at it. This isn't the best example of 'Upside down' art; there are a *lot* of paintings that have been hung upside down in Galleries. As you say, it's in the name more than it is in the actual art *of* the art. :) ~F~

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well the artist probably makes those things with their own meanings, perhaps to convey a certain feeling. i like quite a lot of abstract art. i know that some of it may look a bit silly (and a bit overpriced too lol) <br />
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i saw a cartoon once, im not sure what show it was but i think it was Little Lulu. but the kids were in an art gallery and the youngest one took a piece of paper and scribbled some crayons on it, then took some gum and stuck it to the wall. people who came by saw it and acted like it was a masterpiece by Picasso! lol i just thought that was really funny.<br />
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there is a lot of art i don't like, but i appreciate any work because its an ex<x>pression by the artist. it must mean something right?

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For the record, I do love modern art (or some of it at least), if its worth thousands, thats an open question. That is of course unless its a famous artist and it the motivation is investment more than appreciation of something someone painted.

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yeah thats true, i would want to buy something because i like and appreciate it, not for the money.

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I've often wondered who is the idiot here , those that "crayon " the pictures , or those who pay lots of money to buy them ? I know which one my money is on............ now where did I leave my box of crayons ..lol....

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If you are genuinely interested you have to know a bit of the history first. Certain movements in art are inspired by the mood of the times and past art etc. When you start to learn why they have produced what they have and where they are coming from this is where you start to get a feel for what they are trying to say.

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I can imagine if this is your field of speciality or interest it would make for an interesting subject. Most of it is unfortunately lost on the average person. Guess that why the average person wont pay $50,000 for a painting they cant appreciate as being that valuable.

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it deals with the ex<x>pression in side of the painting. someone drew it like that for a reason.

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Yep, hidden meanings, witchcraft, pretense and money laundering.

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If I knew, I'd be a millionaire

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