1. Nothing travels faster than light. <br />
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2. Light is always measured at the same speed (roughly 186,000 mph) no matter how fast you are traveling or the direction you are going.<br />
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3. The faster you travel, the slower time moves, the heavier you get and longer things become shorter.<br />
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However, the hardest part to grasp is the fact that as you move, nothing to you is different. Your clock will still tick away at the same rate. An observer, however, would notice your clock running slower. You would notice the observer's clock runining slower while they would be seeing things perfectly normal<br />
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It's all relative to the observer. <br />
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General relativity incorporates gravity into the equation and shows how gravity effects time, bends light and thus effects time. A clock for intance on the ground next to the Empire State building will run faster than a clock on the top of the building because the pull of the earth causes clocks to run slightly slower then a clock that is further away from the center of the planet.

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I think you have your answer.

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Thanks for your reply but unfortunately you've over steeped the word quota previously requested.

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Get real! 100 words or less? lol

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ME!!! Real? ;-)

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should aslo specify special relativity or general relativity

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Try Wikipedia

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I need a short explanation I suffer from narcolepsy.

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Theory of relativity... Fun... Essentially time is not constant. lol.<br />
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Ok, better explanation which my physic's prof used. I'm sitting on a train moving at a velocity of x. I throw a ball up into the air y displacement and took z seconds. I then catch the ball. The ball in relation to me went up, then straight down. Final Displacement is 0m.<br />
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Now I do that again with you watching from outside of the train. You see me throw the ball up then it comes down. It travels in an arc because it is moving with the train. Thus for you the ball had a final displacement which is calculated by the formula, d=v*t<br />
v = x t = z<br />
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Now relativity has only one constant. Light. Everything is calculated in relationship to it, as well as the reference point of the observer. In the above example I was the first observer and you were the second. As noted our point of view is completely different because we used different variables to calculate the exact same thing. The total displacement of the ball I threw.<br />
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The thing about relativity is, faster you go less time it takes for you to get where you are going, as well as how heavy you are. Grr... I forget the third thing... mass increases, your velocity increases. Yet your actual velocity will dictate how long it will take for you to get to a location. Yet, at the same 'time', you will get to your destination sooner than that for your own calculations because of the dilation effect. Time is not a constant. It's fluid.<br />
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The reason we can't go faster than light essentially the problem with the increase in mass which the dilation effect has on the subject. Kinetic Energy is mass multiplied by velocity. Yet the formula for Potential Energy (probably incorrect term) is E = Mass multiplied by the speed of light multiplied by the speed of light. If we go As fast as light, we need infinite amount of energy to maintain our velocity.<br />
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Sorry, this is all I can remember from physics 11 which I took eight years ago. You'll need to go over the formulas yourself to make sure you have all the variables labeled correctly. It is essential to remember which variable represent the ob<x>ject moving at relativistic speed and the observer who isn't moving. Mix those two up, and you get, gobbledygook for an answer.

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How many words was that?

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more than 100 less than the speed of light...idk, lol.

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In a nutshell, time is relative to light. According to Einstein, nothing can go faster than light. So far anyway, this has been found to be true by the CERN facility in Europe. They though they had disproved it, but checked and re-checked, and their original results were wrong. With that said, you cannot travel into the future. However, because light does bend somewhat, if you travel fast enough in a straight line, you could end up seeing yourself in the past. Clear as mud.

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