N N N nnnnnn not till you mentioned it

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Yes, during middle & high school. I think it was just nerves. Or the thought of everybody listening to me that made me nervous.

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YYYYYYYYYYYYY NO

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no but one of my older brother did. i didn't think it was a problem. but i thought it was weird that no one else talked like that.

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if i am really really stressed out and severely anxious like on the very of a attack the i start to stutter. or when i am in full blown mania i speak really fast and talk over my words which is similiar to stuttering.

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Absolutely. Got past it without ritalin or that other stuff.

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Yes, we all go. The problem install depending on what we make of it.<br />
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When did you start stuttering? Early childhood? That's when you remember your first memories of trying to speak and receiving feed-back from the adults that surrounded you, right? <br />
People probably (and well intended) gave you hints and words of encouragement, such as "Calm down, take a breath. Make a pause. Speak slowly" and so on. While they were the one who should have stayed calm and listen carefully. Because that disfluency in that age only meant you were becoming self-aware of the production of your language, therefore you seemed/felt all of the sudden not so fluent/confident.<br />
It's hard to do any automatic thing we now if we feel like we are being watched. Think about driving, for example. It's perfectly easy until the driving test you or you father gets in the car with you. Once it happens, you make all silly mistakes. It does not mean you cannot drive, or that you are not aware of them, it's the pressure for perfectionism that screws up how we end up doing it. <br />
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Similar mechanism is triggered in fluency disorders. You have incorporated that sense of self-correction you created at age 4-5, and every time you anticipate your speech is going to be broken, you convert a normal and perfectly acceptable disfluency mark into fear of not succeeding, and then it blows even more. You feel like you cannot control it, right? Well, CONTROL is how the stuttering gets installed! There would not be stuttering if there was no ANTICIPATION and attempt to control it. <br />
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People who complain about stuttering don’t do it when they sing. Nor when they are alone. Nor when they are acting in a play. That’s an evidence of how stuttering stems from the conflict between improvisation X anticipation, so the audience, the interpersonal component is essential for its manifestation.<br />
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You may have less "speech problems" when you find easiness and acceptance in your audience, when you can relax and be yourself. Also, forget about those tricky words. Be aware that we wall stumble on words, all the time, we just don't give a sh*t to it. Have you ever stopped to think how cooperative and condescending you are with everyone else's disfluencies, opposed to how hard and perfectionist you are towards you own ones? <br />
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Disfluencies are meant to happen a lot when we are elaborating our though, they are natural. The breaks, pauses, perseverations, hesitations and silences in our speech reveal so much of the truth of how we feel about a subject. Why do people want to erase them?

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