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RickMason RickMason 16-17, M 5 Answers Jan 20 in Politics

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The problem is not, "not knowing" how to fix it... The problem is the people with the power to fix it.. like it just the way it is.

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People with power have no reason to fix it, so they will not. That is the problem.

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It might cause more problems than you want.

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Pointing corruption out will often help your country, or even help humanity as a whole. "Freedom of ex<x>pression", meaning freedom of speech and freedom of the press, is a path that the forefathers of various countries put in place partly in order to help expose the corrupt to the light of public scrutiny. Ultimately, in cases of corruption, the opinion of the people will generally win if the corruption is made known to the public.<br />
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Take care though to be generally highly accurate in accusations of corruption. In China for example, publicly declaring evidence of corruption that turns out to be false can result in four years in detention. Aside from the penalties for publicly declaring false evidence in whatever country you live in, there is a moral consideration as well. Put yourself in the other person's shoes. For example, if you are an honest government official would you want someone knowingly telling a lie that you had a one million dollar Swiss bank account full of bribe money if you are too poor to keep even the next three months of your rent payments in your bank account?<br />
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To sum up, feel free to publicly point out evidence of corruption if you feel that the corruption is against the interest of your country or against the interest of humanity, but at the same time guard against declaring evidence that is false.

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So you say that corruption will not occur if pointed out? I would like to see the proof of that.

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I repeat, "the opinion of the people will generally win if the corruption is made known to the public." The public does not always win in such cases, but usually wins because of the power of numbers. As an example, I now tell a story about a policeman who decided to take wristwatches from motorists in exchange for not handing out traffic fines. He boldly wore about a half dozen watches, and was photographed on cell phones by numerous motorists while wearing those watches. He eventually became infamous in his country on social media, and lost his job. I did not follow the story closely. Perhaps he was locked up as well for his wristwatch theft, or perhaps not. What counts in this story though is the power of the people. The wristwatch policeman believed he would be protected in his thievery by other policemen, and perhaps his belief was true for a few days, but ultimately the power of the people won, and he lost his job, and he can no longer be greedily corrupt in that job.

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No, that is why "Snowden" is now a "man without a country." One must think before one acts. I had this converation a few weeks ago with another EPer. Snowden didn't tell us something we already didn't know, but because he didn't "think ahead" he is now forced to seek solitude from a "former enemy" of the United States.

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