Do we hell .<br />
We have a disgusting history , <br />
Soon Aussies will celebrate Australia day , a day in which is the anniversary of us invading their land .<br />
I just wish most Aussies knew the real history and not the one fed to them .

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I like to look for signs of hope. Recently I travelled to Uluru and just being there spoke volumes. Where, among the 700+ people working there, were the aboriginals? However do those who are not artists get on? Uluru, it is widely publicised, was "handed back" to the aborigines, but a visit there will soon enlighten you about this ie it is joint management now between the Anangu people and the Dept of Parks and wildlife. Consider Intervention. Surely a team of social workers and maybe a police officer is the way to go when confronting these difficult problems? But the frigging army! This traumatised so many people. Like those needing mental health services, I fear Indigenous Australians have to negotiate a maze of policies that are established upon prejudice. I still look for signs of hope, but I keep seeing oh so many mistakes.

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WE CAN'T BE PROUD<br />
From the 16th through the 19th centuries, the population of Native Americans declined in the following ways: epidemic diseases brought from Europe; genocide and warfare[37] at the hands of European explorers and colonists, as well as between tribes; displacement from their lands; internal warfare,[38] enslavement; and a high rate of intermarriage.[39][40] Most mainstream scholars believe that, among the various contributing factors, epidemic disease was the overwhelming cause of the population decline of the American natives because of their lack of immunity to new diseases brought from Europe.[41][42][43] With the rapid declines of some populations and continuing rivalries among their nations, Native Americans sometimes re-organized to form new cultural groups, such as the Seminoles of Florida in the eighteenth century and the Mission Indians of Alta California.<br />
<br />
Estimating the number of Native Americans living in what is today the United States of America before the arrival of the European explorers and settlers has been the subject of much debate. While it is difficult to determine exactly how many Natives lived in North America before Columbus,[44] estimates range from a low of 2.1 million (Ubelaker 1976) to 7 million people (Russell Thornton) to a high of 18 million (Dobyns 1983).[45] A low estimate of around 1 million was first posited by the anthropologist James Mooney in the 1890s, by calculating population density of each culture area ba<x>sed on its carrying capacity. In 1965, the American anthropologist Henry Dobyns published studies estimating the original population to have been 10 to 12 million. By 1983, he increased his estimates to 18 million.[46] He took into account the mortality rates caused by infectious diseases of European explorers and settlers, against which Native Americans had no immunity. Dobyns combined the known mortality rates of these diseases among native people with reliable population records of the 19th century, to calculate the probable size of the original populations.[4][5] By 1800, the Native population of the present-day United States had declined to approximately 600,000, and only 250,000 Native Americans remained in the 1890s.[47]

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Our country treat governors well.thats all we have got

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