I worked in nursing homes and hospitals for years, it became a very normal thing for me to see dead bodies.

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Yes. Jewish tradition someone stays with the body at all times.

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Do you mean outside of a funeral or a wake? <br />
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Saw my dead uncle before he was cremated. His wish was to have no wake, nor funeral. He had been "refrigerated" until cremation. The body did not even look like him. I was sad because I'd lost my uncle, but not shocked nor freaked out.

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Yes. I even Pulled a dead person out of a car when I was with police too

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I used to work at a nursing home on the night shift. There were a number of times that I happened to be the nurse aide who found someone. It was always a sad occasion, but you learn to deal with it.

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I saw a few of them when I was younger. That was just the type of area I lived in. At the time I was little. Now that I am an adult, and have not been around that kind of thing in years, I'm sure it would freak me out. ...It didn't then, though... o_0

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Thank you, Silver1105, for the LIKE, LOL =)

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more then once and many times in combat i made my share of them<br />
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also have had to deal with a few working in ER in mylife the hardest is children to deal with

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I used to work as a field technician and a few of our customers were funeral homes. So a few time I worked in the preparation room were there would be several bodies being dressed and makeup applied. It was a surreal experience to see such care being taken on someone who could no longer feel.

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Several times, when burying a body in a funeral. When I was in a bus that got into an accident, I saw the driver and the guy next ti him shattered and completely void of life. Finally, when I was in the military I saw the body of a decapitated woman, from the looks of it she was raped before being murdered. These three events taught me that death is an inevitable outcome for our lives, some go peacefully and others violently, but the only common thing about these three cases was that they all were at peace. It is horrible what man can do to their brethren and how fragile life might seem in certain cases.

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Yes, several in the morgue.

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yes i see them die every day

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Yes i work in a crematorium i see around 30_40 a week kinda get use to it babies still kinda get you down but scene working there its made my fear of death go up

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Yes, my grandparents, great grandparents, lots of great aunts and uncles, my friend's dad, another friend's mom. I saw my cousin after he drowned in the Pacific ocean, was swept out to sea, and then inexplicably was returned. I saw my very good friend after she had been pulled out of a car accident. In my opinion I've seen enough. Some I've seen at the funeral, some not. If it was an elderly person I was sad but relieved in some cases because they had been ill for a long time. In the cases of my cousin and my friend, it tore pain into places I didn't even know I had. Still haven't totally come to grips with my cousin's death and it's been 14 years. <br />
When I worked with families, I saw the bodies of several babies and toddlers who had passed away. A few had fatal conditions, and a few had been abused. That was the most wrong thing I have ever seen, those tiny little caskets.

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Many times. For the most part, viewing someone's remains is unremarkable. Their face takes on a kind of smooth, waxy appearance as the facial muscles relax and they don't move. This is before the discoloration starts.<br />
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What I have found absolutely fascinating is to be with someone at the moment of death if they are having a peaceful death. The person's focus seems to shift from the people around them and the person focuses on something else in the room, although nothing is there. In the instances I have seen, it is usually some random area high up on the wall. Their breathing slows to a stop and the gaze is then fixed and unmoving.

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All the time. I was a nurse for 30 years. You get used to it. You have to

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Yes. I was 15. A drowned... Brrrr

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The first dead person I saw, was my daddy at his funeral when I was 7 years old. I remember feeling very angry. I carried that anger about his death around for 20 years til I got divorced & had to make room inside my head for new issues.<br />
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After that I went to several relatives funerals & also dealt with deceased clients when I worked in a nursing home. I worked at the nursing home at the ages of 17 & 18. It was really hard on me. I contstantly thought about dying.<br />
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Two years ago, my mom passed away at 60. My mom was tortured by many emotional issues & drank heavily. Even though I knew in the back of my mind that she would pass away early, her passing was a HUGE shock for me.<br />
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Viewing my mom's body was even more difficult than viewing my dad's. My mom's face was very bloated & she just did not look like my mom as I knew her. Even so, I viewed her body several times for hours at each visit. I would stand by her & hold her hand & talk to her. My ex-MIL came to view my mom's body & as we were standing there, we both commented on how it looked like my mom was still breathing. I'm sure it was just a normal occurence as the body begins to break down. Nonethless, a part me had hope that it was all a mistake & that she was still alive.<br />
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The funeral was the hardest part of it all. Actually, after the funeral, when they started to wheel my mom's coffin out was the worst. It took every bit of emotional strength I had in me, not to run after them, because I realized that when my mom's body was gone I would never see her again. I'm tearing up just thinking about it.

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Only at funerals.<br />
When i was little though, if i stayed up too late at night i'd think i saw them around the house.

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I had stepped off the elevator and was just outside my grandfather's hospital room when he stopped breathing and my mom and grandmom came out of the room as I was running in. He took another gasp as me and my uncle were sitting there in shock and I thought maybe he was still alive. My uncle, who spent 9 months fighting in the Vietnam War, told me that wasn't the case and that he was really gone. <br />
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That same uncle passed away from stomach cancer in December 2010. I saw him at his funeral and just remember thinking that it did not look like him at all.<br />
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My 92 year old, healthy as a horse grandmother, his mother, passed away 3 months later from a broken heart. I woke up in the hospital room to the heart monitor alarm and watched her take that last breath as the doctor was confirming her vitals.<br />
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I don't know if it was fortunate or unfortunate that I did not make the four hour ride from our home at the time to my mom's before the ambulance took my 25 year old son to the morgue 15 days after my grandmother passed away. They did an autopsy and he was cremated so I did not get to see him. I don't think I could have handled seeing him like that. He was already gone for hours before my mom realized he was gone and another 3 hours before the police released his body to the morgue and his body was finally put on ice.<br />
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My mother pretty much fell apart at the seams and was diagnosed with bladder cancer one month after all that. 5 and a half months later she passed away at home "in her sleep". When I saw her take her last breath it was almost a relief knowing that she wasn't suffering any more.

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yes - it wasn't my favourite experience.

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