They had to disassociate themselves from a lot of their childhood friends, even turning the names into authorities of those that did not agree with the adopted doctrine.<br />
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They were not allowed to demonstrate individuality.<br />
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They had to spend a lot of time away from family.

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thank you very much. thagt will really help

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I had a high school teacher, originally from Heidelberg, whose older brother was a member of the Deutsches Jungvolk as a child (she trusted me not to tell any of my classmates, and I never did) He described it as being like a bootcamp, with emphasis on exercise, history (indoctrination) and affirmations about the German people. She (the teacher) said basically everyone had to send their children, she was too young to go to the girl's group or she would've been sent, too.

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thank you. must have been so hard for the children and many of the parents being forced into something like that

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It was a dead end job with no future thankfully

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his art was rejected for joining art school, he then later killed lots of people.

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I did my senior thesis on it the children were raised fanatical, given too much power. With one word they could make accusations and people, family even, would disappear. By my side there is a Hitler Youth helmet given to me by a veteran that belonged to a girl named 'Inge' (That's the name in the helmet). She was about 15, she raised a gun against that American GI who was manning a Browning Automatic Rifle when given the chance to surrender. Some ex hitler youth members even took part in "Operation Werwolf' where they continued fighting after the war, hanging people and placing signs around their necks with anti occupational slogans such as "I betrayed the Reich" and then "ate lunch" nearby. They were fanatical theyd face tanks, guns, and refuse to surrender. They had their childhood stolen to fight and kill ANYONE who opposed National Socialism.

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