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moonmaiden76 moonmaiden76 31-35, F 18 Answers Jun 16, 2009

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When you went there to help with suicidal thoughts, and leave with homicidal thoughts.

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Now THAT is a tough question...and one that I've pondered myself many times, although I have little experience visiting such people. I've done some...but not extensively.<br />
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For some people, therapy is their opportunity to vent in ways they can't to family, friends and coworkers. A trained therapist can help you focus and direct yourself...help you make the most of your stresses and worries.<br />
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However, there is also the fact that your therapist is being PAID to listen...and the more listening they do, the more they get paid. If you were paying me $100's per hour to listen to you, I'd want you to talk til you're blue in the face...each week for about an hour...and "come back same time next week to continue our discussion." After all, I couldn't very well reach a point where I'd tell you, "Yep, we're all done here. I've done what I can do. Please stop coming and helping pay for my rent/mortgage." Are you kidding me? I want you there like clockwork, writing that check. <br />
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So from that standpoint, I have to take whatever the therapist says with a grain of salt. They are NEVER going to tell you that you are cleared and don't need to come back...and the rare one who MIGHT...is just that: VERY RARE!<br />
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I think you have to ask yourself some hard questions. Do an exercise like they have you do sometimes. WRITE DOWN all the good things that have resulted from your having attended counseling. Do you feel less stressed? Are you not as angry or scared or whatever it is that you were there to resolve in the first place?<br />
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Is this the only person to whom you open up and tell your inner feelings? What if they are gone? Will you bottle them up inside or is there another person with whom you have been sharing those feelings...like a GF/BF or spouse? Remember, it's hard to evaluate yourself. You may THINK you don't need counseling but others may disagree. Try to ask friends if they think you are different as a result of the counseling. Remember that if you FEEL the counselor is not helping...it might be that you need a different counselor...not that you should stop seeing a counselor entirely.<br />
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If you can literally LIST ON PAPER all the things that the therapist has helped you solve...and you can truly agree that NONE OF THOSE THINGS ARE ISSUES IN ANY WAY...then perhaps you might be ready. But you MUST ask others for their viewpoint as well. If you do consider stopping...why not try a phasing-out slowly? Extend the normal visitation cycle...if you go weekly, try every other week. If you go every two weeks...try every three or four instead. See what effect that has on you, not visiting them as often. You might find that it HELPS, because you will have more to discuss at each meeting, since more time will have elapsed between meetings. Just my $.02 worth.

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When you are perrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrfect :-)

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When your therapist has cracked up due to listening to your problems for too long.

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When your insurance stops paying. No just kidding...... Being a therapist myself we are trained to do a "termination process" It is also referred to as discharge planning. A therapist is supposed to a plan with the client's input of goals and ob<x>jectives. They are long and short term goals. The termination process is a gradual decrease of services as the goals and ob<x>jectives are met. Metaphorically speaking your therapist gives you tools to solve your problems and teaches you how to use them. Then monitors how you are using them until you feel safe enough to use them without supervision. When you have begun to effectively use your tools or new skills you learn in therapy and feel comfortable without the supervision, it is time to stop seeing your therapist.

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I guess I lucked out, I had a wonderful therapist who had to let me know that I had reached a point where I no longer needed him. It was a hard thing for me to accept at first, but the more I thought about it, the more it made sense to me, and I was able to see how much I had learned about myself. I still miss talking to him though, but I now feel(even 8 years later) 100% more comfortable confronting my problems and working them out on my own, than I ever did before. :-)

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they normally tell me. the last one i had said i dont think there's anything more i can do for you, you understand you better than me!. So i guess its when you both come to a understanding of yourself but you are the one who is really getting it.

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I quit seeing my therapist when we started spending time talking about Battlestar Galactica because we had worked out all my issues. Does that help? Good luck. :)

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Never, everyone should have one and the bills should be paid by the government or at least always be tax deductible

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When you ask this question but seriously I don't know never been there.

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When your broke

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when all the talking is her and its like you are friends,,,but you have to pay for that and it really is not helping me one bit,,,thats when I cut it off,,,anyway I am not doing what they want me to do anyway,,,I buy pills and won't take them so why should I go to these people anyway,,,I am just throwing money to the wind,,,Mary

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When we have nothing to talk about and I realize I am giving money away I could be using for something more useful.

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When you feel that your ready I guess? And aren't worried or having/posing problems...When you feel contentment with yourself and the world.

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