Now it sort of depends on whether you are asking about telecom, and/or television signals and the difference products that are supported. Originally most telecom devices ran off an analog signal. <br />
Basically analog is the process of taking an audio or video signal (in most cases, the human voice) and translating it into electronic pulses. Digital on the other hand is breaking the signal into a binary format where the audio or video data is represented by a series of "1"s and "0"s. Simple enough when it's the device—analog or digital phone, fax, modem, or likewise—that does all the converting for you. Analog came first and it had been around for many years. One company that did a lot of pioneering with this technology was MCI. Although this company is no longer around (it was absorbed by Verizon) they made great strides in upgrading the quality of phone services. Analog technology has been around for decades. It's not that complicated a concept and it's fairly inexpensive to use. That's why we can buy a cheap telephone or watch a few TV stations with the use of a well-placed antenna. The trouble is analog signals have size limitations as to how much data they can carry so they limit us in what we can receive. <br />
The newer of the two signals is digital. Digital technology breaks your voice (or television) signal into binary code—a series of 1s and 0s—transfers it to the other end where another device (phone, modem or TV) takes all the numbers and reassembles them into the original signal. The beauty of digital is that it knows what it should be when it reaches the end of the transmission. That way, it can correct any errors that may have occurred in the data transfer. What does all that mean to you? Clarity. In most cases, you'll get distortion-free conversations and clearer TV pictures.<br />
So how can you tell a digital signal from an analog signal? Look at the back of the telephone connected to it. If you see "complies with part 68, FCC Rules" and a Ringer Equivalence Number (REN), then the phone and the line are analog. Almost all cell phones are digital these days and there are limited areas that still carry analog signal for the cell services. Remember how we talked about limited capacity on analog signals. It is more cost effective for the cell provider to run more data on a digital network than to increase analog lines in most areas plus the companies can run more than just the cell calls across this network, as they can relay data and other business services across the network with a lower capacity requirement. <br />
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Sorry for being so long winded. You will notice that most digital products these days state they are digital on the paperwork that comes with them.

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FG:<br />
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Do you work for MCI/Verizon?<br />
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Most women do not know that much about telecommunications. And that includes the ones that work there.

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