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novemberbaby80 novemberbaby80 31-35, F 17 Answers Sep 18, 2012 in Motherhood

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Wait 10 years and try again...

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great answer!~

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My youngest of 2 daughters and a son will be 39 in November. I have plenty of experience! Thanks...

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LOL

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I don't know any other type of teenager

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And the Best Answer go to.......maddmatter70!!!

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Let her learn the hard way. I was a perfect teen, never did anything wrong, never had any problems witht he law, my parents liked my friends...<br />
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I grew up to completely **** up my life because I had no idea what to do when trouble struck. I also had no idea how to function in normal society because to be honest if you're not a drug user or drinking you're in the minority.

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Keep your head, keep your temper, don't take it personally and exercise extreme patience. Apply firm but gentle pressure and hold your ground.

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my sister was the same way. staring her in the face and saying "yup okay your always right" with a sarcastic tone really got to her after a month to cut the attitude.

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Wow, that's fighting fire with fire...;p

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when you live with it long enough you'll get frustrated enough to just blow off pretty much everything they say until they admit they are guessing.
we also sang her a song when we didn't believe what she was saying "story time story time. when every "insert name" 's around it's story time

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for some teen if you don't nip that attitude in the but they carry it though their adult lives. better to be harsh than raise a butt head.

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First, lovingly but firmly remind her that by the very fact that she IS a teenager, she hasn't lived long enough to know everything (otherwise she'd be a college graduate with a PhD).<br />
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Second (and she may not get this), tell her that the fact that she is says that she knows everything is in fact evidence that she doesn't because if she did, she wouldn't have to say it - she could prove it.<br />
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Lastly, remind her that you've lived a lot longer and you still don't 'everything' and ask her "So how could you?"<br />
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If she continues, I suggest taking her OYK :)

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She has a different fr<x>ame of reference. You have seen more. Like many others who said so, I'd agree: Wait X number of years. <br />
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Or, you could do the classic, "Whateverrrrrrrrr...," roll your eyes, and walk away. <br />
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People throwing a tantrum NEED an audience. A tantrum without an audience fizzles out pretty fast....

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Lots of that is typical teenager. Look up Love & Logic parenting. Great ideas on how to work with anyone, even teens.

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I've dealt with people like this. Basically you need to have a "conversation" with them, where there is a wait for their responses(regardless of what they respond). Also needed is a lot, plenty, much endless, patience, almost a patranizing of them paitience needed. Any idea you want t to put in their head, you have to make seem as though they came up with the idea. I've found the best way to do so is to dance around the idea so that they realize it themselves. Do NOT ever tell them the idea. Let it come to them. Though this may take practice, believe me. It works.

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Classic...common...I'm shaking my head. I understand...4 children...all 30+ now, but it was a battle. Sometimes they still revert back...good luck

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I have the same problem. Wow, She will be learning the hard way.

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When you try to teach a pig to sing, you do two things, one you waste your time, and two you annoy the pig.

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Sadly, you don't.<br />
You just have to let her do her thing and learn the hard way. It's how teens are wired.

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