An 8lb woodchuck of average fitness would throw small branches a distance of about 3 inches. Given an 8 hour day and seasonal adjustments (they don't work in winter), the woodchuck could shift about 1.2 tons of wood a total distance of 3 inches in a year. The said woodchuck would have no purpose in shifting all this wood, and may in fact reduce its chance of finding a mate since the behaviour in woodchuck terms would be seen as a little bizarre, and not at all attractive to female woodchucks who would get tired of walking around the wood, and may in fact not notice the said woodchucking woodchuck behind the giant pile. He would die alone, in the midst of a philosophical crisis of existence. I think the person who created the misnomer of 'woodchucks' has a lot to answer for.

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you know what ? I don't know ! because that question's NEVER been asked on here ! Jesus, is that you ? :-P

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I believe it completely depends on the strength of the individual woodchuck. While shopping for one keep you eye out for a hearty strong one with nice clear eyes and recently sharpened teeth.

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Using the formula: (W + I) * C where W = the constant of wood, which is well known to be 61, as agreed in many scientific circles. I = the variable in this equation, and stands for the word "if" from the original problem. As there are three circumstances, with 0 equaling the chance that the woodchuck cannot chuck wood, 1 being the theory that the woodchuck can chuck wood but chooses not to, and 2 standing for the probability that the woodchuck can and will chuck wood, we clearly must choose 2 for use in this equation. C = the constant of Chuck Norris, whose presence in any problem involving the word chuck must there, is well known to equal 1.1 of any known being, therefore the final part of this calculation is 1.1. As is clear, this appears to give the answer of (61 + 2) * 1.1 = (63) * 1.1 = 69.3. However, Chuck Norris' awesome roundhouse kick declares that all decimal points cannot be used in formulas such as this, and so it must be rounded to the final solution of 69 units of wood.

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I'd say about the same by volume as the guy who had the gum-boil who asked <i>'How much oil would a gum-boil boil, if a gum-boili could boil oil.'</i><br />
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<b>;)</b><br />
<br />
~F~

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