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paclark paclark 31-35 35 Answers Feb 11, 2012

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If they are planning to live here permanently, yes I think they should. I certainly would, and I'm surprised that some people don't bother. It would certainly be an advantage in being able to participate more fully here. Of course, in the U.S. English isn't technically the "mother tongue" , but it is the predominant language spoken here.

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True

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Yes. It demonstrates respect for the people and country you have chosen to call home.

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Absolutely-and I don't think I should have my time wasted listening to language options on the phone when I need a problem solved by a company I deal with. My ancestors learned as did their children. Now you have generations of families who can't speak the native language of the country they chose to come to and everybody has to accommodate them for their laziness. Sick of it.

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Yes. But that does not mean to abandon their mother tongue. Commonality of language helps to integrate people into a new society .

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I take off my hat to those who's second language is english and who you can see do there very best to learn the language and speak in english.

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YES

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OMG-YES! & it should be a LAW!

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Yes. When you emigrate, you adjust to the people you emigrate to. You don't expect them to adjust to you.

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Yes. Absolutely. Just as I would learn the language if I were to move to a different country.

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I live in Toronto. It's one of the most multicultural cities in the world. There are a lot of immigrants here who get by without knowing a word of english (or french, for that matter); they're able to stay within their communities and get by that way. I realize that it's unrealistic to demand it or expect it. I also realize that it's really hard for a newcomer to make a living and learn english at the same time. However, if they're planning to stay, that should be part of the price of admission; as well, they should know something about our culture and our shared values.

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most people tend to if they can. I think to be able to get a work visa it might be a legitimate requirement but just to live somewhere I don't know. I mean think of all the english speaking retired folks with homes in mexico and central america....not to mention all the foreigners in cheap asian countries chilling. If people actually had to know the language before moving somewhere there'd be a lot less moving. We tend to only think of one side of things. If we demand lots of requirements from other countries...they demand them from us. People forget that part.

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If you don't, you're a dumbass.

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Absolutely! Why should the whole change for the convenience of the few?

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Yeah I do

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Yes. I do think that.

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Absolutely!!!!!

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Naturally, how else would they be able to buy Fish & Chips!

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I think it just makes it easier in the long run for the immigrant to learn the language of the country. <br />
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That said, I would like to make a comment: I have lived in several non-English speaking countries. The number of English-speaking people, who have lived for YEARS in these countries and cannot speak the country's mother tongue, is ridiculously high. <br />
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I hope these people are not the same people bashing immigrants for not being able to speak English.

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yes they should learn the language of the country they move to and to write in that language say they want to work in the hospital as a doctor or nurse if they were to make a mistake in that situation people could be killed also it is better for them as they need to make new friends and how are they going to do that if they can not talk to people

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I certainly wouldn't expect a foreign country to pander to my ignorance of their tongue.

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