Post
I've already been promised a bonus, some personal expenses covered, some overtime pay and I've been told I should think about exactly how much money I want as a pay rise... I am actually indispensable at the moment. i.e. There is literally nobody that we know of who could fill my role and get the work done on time... but at the same time I don't want to screw the company over.
fakeola fakeola 26-30, M 8 Answers Jan 6, 2013 in Work

Your Response

Cancel

Wages should go up around 4-5% a year so figure out what is appropriate using that sort of math. You're also in a negotiation - so have your 'ideal' number as a backup, not your first offer. Hell, ask for as high as 10% if you think you're worth it.



As well, have a ready justification of what you have done to earn this raise, and how you plan to improve over the next year. Have solid, definable goals.

Best Answer

I've already used the inflation argument, but we don't work that way... its a small company so it needs to be practical for the company as well as fair to me. Good advice though... thank you. As it happens I'm thinking of asking for 50% more, with about 70% as a starting point... :)

Best Answer

Even better!

Best Answer

if u already have a understanding with your company that u are deserving of a raise then u should just be able to walk in and finalise that understanding



the important thing is to make a modest request because while u may be indispensible right now just remember that u learned the job and so can someone else if your demands are unreasonable

Best Answer

this is good advice - but i am very confident that i really am not replaceable - unless i teach someone else they won't be able to gain the skill which is making me indispensable. there is one other person i know of who is close, but not quite there and they work for the industry leader in their research department... although once i do lay this golden egg, my value will drop massively.

Best Answer

Research what people doing similar jobs in your geographical are being paid if you have not yet done so, then make your request commensurate. From the sounds of it you could ask for the higher end of the salary range, but not if it's a huge jump from what they are already paying you.

Best Answer

There is one aspect of my job which makes this difficult though - there is one other person I know of who does something similar - they work for the industry leader in the field in a research role - I can't really find out what they earn and its not a fair comparison because its for a multi-billion dollar company. However, the next best thing (i.e. my job minus the unique aspects) tends to get people around 50-70% more than what I currently earn.

Best Answer

That is a huge jump for the company to cover. Have you been able to find out how profitable your company has been in the past couple of years and what their projection is for next year? I'd consider those aspects, too, in regards to how much of an increase to ask for.

Best Answer

I know they can afford it comfortably. This is part of why I am intending to be so aggressive...

Best Answer

And of course how readily do you believe you will be able to find work elsewhere, i.e., how much of a gamble are you taking and how much of a gamble are you comfortable taking?

Best Answer

I've already been offered jobs ranging from £45k-£110k elsewhere, as well as 6 month contract work at £10k per month. I have a constant supply of recruiters and companies trying to steal me away. There is effectively no personal risk, but I want to stay where I am because it is a small company and I get to choose direction a lot more...

Best Answer

Sounds to me like the 50% is a good request then, though I do want to give the disclaimer that this is not my area of expertise.

Best Answer

And good luck to you!

Best Answer

Thanks. :)

Best Answer
5 More Responses

Dont take no for an answer

Best Answer

Bless your soul

Best Answer

Related Questions