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I watched a movie where an experiment went wrong and a sun (that was about the size of a small fireplace) materialized in the room (which had carpet and wooden chairs/tables) and the temperature of the sun was approx. 160,000 degrees celsius. But in the movie, the sun only minorly burnt the curtains and nothing else was disturbed, is that possible? if this happened in real life would there be only minor damage? The sun vanished in about 2 seconds after it appeared
StaphAdminer StaphAdminer 31-35, M 7 Answers Dec 27, 2012 in Movies & TV

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lol you watch lame movies!

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Not possible to have a sun that small. Fiction writers can write anything they want, but its fiction.

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Back when dinosaurs roamed the earth without their smartphones, there was a visiting professor who came by Charlottesville to talk about the materials needed to build a production fusion reactor, even if someone managed to figure out a stable plasma containment scheme. He also talked about some of the difficulties with using a fusion torch to clean up fission reactor waste. We left the lecture talking about what a great thing it would be to power our lives from wind and sun.

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Materials have what is called an enthalpy or "rate of heat exchange" and 2 seconds is not enough to exchange a significant amount of heat from a miniature sun. The radiation, however, could do some damage.

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Yes. You can build a Liden Jar which uses high-voltage electricity to create a miniature star that you can safely view and control.

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who rrly knows..this quest is rad

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