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tgaye tgaye 26-30, M 18 Answers Jul 19, 2011

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Yeah, there's a difference. There are black people who come from Cuba, Puerto Rico, Jamaica and other part of the Caribbean, Brazil and other parts of South America, as well as Europe---and Canada. And conversely everyone who comes from the African continent isn't black, but they are technically 'African-American' if they settle in the U.S.

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Not that I know. I answer to both.<br />
There are a lot of black/African people who were born in Africa and other countries.

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The difference is that nobody ever says "black American". They just say "blacks" which some people tend to find offensive. But at least it makes some sense; very few so-called African Americans are actually from Africa these days. Some don't like that term either, because they aren't actually black. But you can't please everybody.

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one is glad to be hear,,the other one thinks the U,S owes them for being born

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Yes, a chip on the shoulder.

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People who have had to fight a lot, and are harassed a lot often act like that. If U got to know them, you'd probably like most of them.

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I'm a gay, autistic, hearing-impaired, transgendered individual. I think I know a little bit about being harassed. People who continue to fight after they have won need to take a step back.

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You think we've "won" ? You MAY know about being persecuted, but until you've walked around as a black person who ISN'T Oprah or the President (two people, out of millions), you can't even BEGIN to understand. And you're totally clueless if you're thinking the average black person is somehow getting a free ride.

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When exactly was this fight "won"? I think it was Stokely Carmichael who said it is foolish for different minority groups to compare their suffering. Your response is an example of the fallacy of self-deductionism.

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Yes there is: namely they live in two different continents, the rest of the features are typical of the continent you live in. Such as if you are always under a blazing sun you become darker and if you are in a cooler environment you are a little lighter. Also, If your country is rich you can afford more including affording to groom yourself more and if your country is poorer its hard to get food let alone buy expensive creams.

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Here is part of an article I read and agree with by John H Mc Whorter from The Los Angeles Times, September, 2004<br />
"Why I'm Black, Not African American"<br />
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Modern America is home now to millions of immigrants who were born in Africa. Their cultures and identities are split between Africa and the United States. They have last names like Onwughalu and Senkofa. They speak languages like Wolof, Twi, Yoruba and Hausa, and speak English with an accent. They were raised on African cuisine, music, dance and dress styles, customs and family dynamics. Their children often speak or at least understand their parents' native language.<br />
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Also, we speak English. Black Americans' home speech is largely ba<x>sed on local dialects of England and Ireland. Africa echoes in the dialect only as a whisper, in certain aspects of sound and melody. A working-class black man in Cincinnati has more in common with a working-class white man in Providence than with a Ghanaian.<br />
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With the number of African immigrants in the U.S. nearly tripling since 1990, the use of "African American" is becoming increasingly strained. Fact is, we are not African to any meaningful extent, but we are not white either - and that is much of why Jesse Jackson's presentation of the term "African American" caught on so fast.<br />
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Meanwhile, the special value of "Black" is that it carries the same potent combination of pride, remembrance and regret that "African American" was designed for. Think of what James Brown meant with "Say it loud, I'm Black and I'm proud." And then imagine: "Say it loud, I'm African American and I'm proud."<br />
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Since the late 1980s, I have gone along with using "African American" for the same reason that we throw rice at a bride - because everybody else was doing it. But no more. From now on, in my writings on race I will be returning to the word I grew up with, which reminds me of my true self and my ancestors who worked here to help make my life possible: Black.

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I was told that black is a mixture of different races which creates brown skin

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yes iand i know the answer it's the spelling

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'Black people' - originally used as a derogatory reference to humans with dark skin.<br />
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There are many nationalities of people with dark skin. This is why some 'black' people living in America do not like being called African American. For one, maybe they were not born Africa. Two, persons of color in America usually include a mixture of many races due to the plight of our heritage, so we become a created race of people, namely 'black' American. Some choose both titles because they can identify with both.There are many reasons why dark skinned persons of America chose their titles.<br />
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Sad part about it is only dark skinned persons in America have this type of identity crisis. Wouldn't it be logical to think that anyone from America be called simply American? <br />
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If the effects of racial superiority is not really an issue of todays America, why is it that a question as simple as this is debated and seemingly difficult to answer. What is the question....race, skin color, or both? Why does it matter what any human define their race to be? You are what you are.

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It WOULD be completely logical to define everyone born here as American, and call it a day, but the REALLY sad part is that it's mostly been the darker skinned persons who were traditionally relegated to the fringes of American society, by custom and even by LAW. There've been incredible strides, truly, but you can't erase four hundred years worth of inequality with "hey, it's resolved, forget about it now" after just fifty years of change. And if you think the effects of racial superiority are not relevant today, you either live in an area like where I am, among people a bit more liberal and evolved, or you're NOT a person of colour and so don't face the day to day bigotry that's still very much alive &amp; well. Look at the current President. If his father had been a white immigrant from England, for example, do you think people would've been clamouring as hard for him to produce his birth certificate and prove he was a U.S. citizen ?

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One of my favourite liquistic torture moments was when an anchorwoman on a US news channel introduced a story about Nelson Mandela, at the time President of S Africa and up for a Nobel Prize. She wanted to say he was one of the most famous black men in the World. What came out in a stutter was ' one of the World's outstanding African Americans".

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Depends on how you define things, I guess. Obviously someone from the black-skinned Indian racial group (Dravidians?) could be both black and American and have nothing to do with Africa.

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Where ever you born thats what u are...if u born in America and u parents were born another country u still american....if you skin is black and u was born in america u black american not african american...african americans are people from africa who have not yet got citizenship...once they get it they renounce africa and pledg to be american then they become black americans....and same goes for any skin color....

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