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There are so many religions in existence today, and there have been many more deities and divine beings in the past. So how can you be sure that the God you were brought up to believe in is really there? What makes, say, a Catholic right, and not a Jew or Muslim or Hindu person right? And if it is the same God, or same idea, only interpreted differently, then why fight over it? The religion you are is based on where you were born. If someone who is a devout Catholic was born in India, he would have been a devout Hindu, or Sikh instead.
daur0s daur0s 18-21, M 19 Answers Jan 1, 2012

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It can be said that *everyone’s* interpretation of who God is … is correct. Religion can be said to be forced onto everyone of us depending on where we are geographically born; a Muslim is unlikely to be a Christian and vice-versa. Atheist have long since argued that there is no God … not even the *one* God if there was such God in whom all worshipped the same. But in any event, a Muslim may not worship any God as those living in the Christian nation may not worship any God either. That leaves *choice* to believe and that gets missed when the topic arises. We each have a *choice* and atheist / none-believes alike tend to lean on people being forced to believe.



Different religions hold different interpretations, but the essence of them all is Faith and Hope in believing. It’s possible that the varying religions could have been born of the *one* belief, and therefore ‘transferred’ in regard to context. For those who believe their God is *the* God holds credence to my way of thinking; they can’t all be right, and if a person is religious, then one must be right and so, geographically, his God is the only God. But no matter how I think about this, on a personal level, a person who believes in God walks in Faith. And for those who don’t believe in God, I often ponder on how there is such a fuss about a person who’s *only* ‘guilt’ (as far as they are concerned) is that of having Faith which they don’t have.



One God, many God’s, right God’s or wrong God’s. Is it really so bad that a person walks in Faith and Hope? Regarding wars? Wars are fought in the name of religion only, not in the Spirit of any religion. Saddam Hussein gave a perfect example of what could be done in the NAME of religion. In the later days, when he was losing hit battle he declared it to be a ‘Holy War’. He did this as an attempt to move his nation into taking up arms and fighting. What he did not do was call his nation to arms in the name of any God.



[Edit] I am not a practicing Christian nor do I belong to any other religious sect. But I have studied the Bible.



~F~

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It is all very well if a man can walk in the path of faith and hope without having destructive influences on those around. If it is happy and beneficial for him then so be it. But it's when religious people start to preach one absolute truth, and start to hate against others in the name of his "faith" that he has gone too far, and he has left any common sense behind him.

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It's a huge debate and one where any of us can pick and choose 'elements' to prove our pleasure or our displeasure; the same can be said of none-believers. There are those who would say they continue to learn within their Faith ... there are those without Faith who declare they need know no more. It goes full circle; the person who has the Faith, the person who has Faith in nothing. It will *always* be Faith which is the driving force of the believer and it will be disbelief which turns the none-believer away. No matter how many generations the fight for and against religion carries on, the base line from where beliver and none-believers is that of Faith. Holding that Faith or choosing to not have that Faith. Millions of words have been written by scholars in both camps ... they both stand on the line where they started. It starts and ends in either Faith or no Faith; from there we can argue for and against into eternity. That is how it is at it's base and that is how it is at the simplest form. The rest are merely words of enforcement. ~F~

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"If people in your town or city Destroyed a small town, but you had nothing to do with it, you should not be blamed." Yes ... I agree with that; absolutely

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It's not something I think about that way. I have studied other sects of Christianity and found that they don't resonate with my heart. I have studied Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and read sacred texts and verses. None of it resonates with my heart in the same way the Bible does. None of it gives me a shiver when sung in song form, none of it soothes my soul deeper.



So I'm nondenominational, and I just pray for guidance on where to go and what to do from there, as I don't care for the division within one religion as it is, but still respect it. And although I have a profound respect for other religions, I just know they are not for me.



Sometimes people believe what they want to believe and what they are capable of believing, based on what they were raised as. Education of other religions can help break those barriers, and either bring you closer in your current faith or stronger in a new found faith.

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Very good, enlightening answer. I respect that you made your choice based on experience of other religions, and stick with what you feel more comfortable with. In a similar way I choose not to believe because I don't feel the drive within me to agree with varying dogma. I understand that you feel right in believing in your faith of choice, and I respect that choice and respect people who can act well and sensibly in religions. It is only those who cannot respect the diversity and use religion as the reason to do wicked things that should not be respected.

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I agree with your last statement there. Thank you for being so respectful in your response!

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Thank you for the agreement, and again for the answer. I may not agree with religion, but I will readily respect any one who does for a reason they feel is right.

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I am certainly with you on the idea that you can't know. It is impossible to prove or disprove the existence of God, Heaven, Hell, spirit, and ghosts. However, religion serves many worthwhile emotional and social functions. Despite the general impression that religious people are violent, hateful, radicals, most religious people are compassionate and loving, even if somewhat tribal and clickish.



Believing your God is the "one true God" gives weak egos the feeling of importance. It allows them to feel loved and protected which can be beneficial to mental health. As a social organization, they reach out and provide services to the poor, sick, and disadvantaged, that we as a society (America) are increasingly unwilling to do. There competition to show that their God is the more compassionate is beneficial to those in need of help.



Most Christians dislike the hate mongering Christians as much as any responsible and compassionate individual. Most Muslims hate the radical clerics that spout hate and call for violence, just like any responsible and compassionate individual does.



I think I drifted off topic. I guess my point is, they can't know, but they can believe. If that belief is beneficial to them and society, what is wrong with it?



You believe they are wrong. They believe you are wrong. If we can't prove that God does or doesn't exist, how can you know who is right?

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Very valid and well thought out answer. I do not wish to criticize religion on the whole as being and evil, or plague upon humanity as some more extreme atheists or agnostics do. Religion does have many wicked aspects, such as genital mutilation in some religions, and patriarchy driving the society. However likewise it has given rise to many great men and been in inspiration to many arts and other positive aspects of culture.
And I take your point, in that atheism also belongs in the "we can't all be right" argument. And I do believe in the absence of superior power, and that is just as valid as you believing in its presence.
Thank you for the answer.

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Old dreams... Also take into account how a person views "God" when considering whether its existence can be known or not. For instance my idea of "God" is that "God" is that quantum level and macro level infinite system of energy of which everything is intertwined with... every atom, every molecule of the known Universe and all of the unknown Universe and Universes. "God" as Omnipresent can only lead one to the conclusion that "God" is everything, everywhere as an energetic system interconnected in the illusion of time and space and beyond time and space................................................................ Who has the Absolute truth.. that does not change even with experience or discovery?

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I thought that my response to DaurOs' original question would be too serious, but have been pleasantly surprised about the number of thoughtful and interesting points of view. It is refreshing to see so many people, like BluOmni, who understand that the concept of God goes far beyond the common view of God as an abusive or benevolent father figure. I agree with the a basic tenant of nearly every major religion, that God is not knowable. Beyond that, I believe our views of who and what God is says more about who we are as an individual, than what God may or may not be. Whether atheist, agnostic, or deeply religious, if a person's understanding give them peace and leads them to a compassionate life, they should be free to worship nothing (atheists,) the moon (Pagans,) saints (Catholic,) fiction writers/aliens (L. Ron Hubbard, aka Church of Scientology,) every atom of the universe (New Age Quantum?,) or anything they want.. A civilized and enlightened society should welcome all these forms or understandings of God. It is when a religion spouts hate, discrimination, and violence that a civilized society should draw a line.

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perhaps they are all wrong :)

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That's what I believe, but I'm interested in hearing from the believers points of views.

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as it all comes down to faith...anybody or anything could be a god! i have faith in my friends...does that make them gods???

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I have faith in Science!

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Well, I'm pretty sure your friends aren't religions, or have holy books and scriptures written about them. I was trying to pose this question more to the idea of mainstream, widely accepted beliefs of religion.

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Well I believe in the Father/Son and Holy Spirit...I do not like labels I simply believe in just was I stated. My husband explained it to me like this...that what I see as God that other religions for them it is the same but just in their culture how they were raised that is what each knows. I am not so sure on that one because each religion has their own ideas. I do however love all people and respect their views. And I suppose we will all find out one day. I am not sure if this helps but just my thoughts on it. :)

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So you are saying that each religion's "god" is one and the same original being or force?
But well done for being accepting of other views. I respect any person's views who can respect others' views.

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Ty and yes that is how my hubby explained it to me anyhow..:)

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Well that I can accept and respect as a more enlightened view than some people have. Thank you.

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Yw :)

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Good luck with that.

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Thank you haha

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Welcome to the sentient population. You have seen the evidence and made up your own mind. That marks your first step into enlightenment. It will get easier now.

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I've long been an enlightened member of the sentient population, if I may say so. I just want to hear a religious person's views on this argument against them. It's good to hear every angle.

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i don't know about other religions but in Judaism there are pillars of belief that one believes in for pure faith, ish. Judaism is often thought of as an extreme religion but the bible describes Jews as " a stiff necked people" (stubborn). there are proofs (one easy and very cool to verify) and Jews are supposed to question. other sects of Judaism are about accepting without question to allow for greater faith in G-d.

generally yes you believe what you were brought up. however as to the True G-d and what about religious people who follow others i still have no satisfactory answer.

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re-ligo / re=again; ligo=league, connection

Thats going to show we are separated of God? Who has done that?

Religions are just a way to rule the crowds, dressed up in traditions of the region they have been created.

btw. I'm believer

and not native speaker

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Sorry, you are wrong in your assumptions. There are two religions. The true one and the false one.

The true one is the Christian belief as described in the holy scriptures. The false one is the Babylonian Mystery Religion as mentioned in the book of Revelations, chapter 17, verse 5. The Babylonian Mystery Religion is Satan's counterfiet of the true religion. It comprises a mother and son plus a third father figure. All religions were developed from the counterfeit religion devised by Satan.

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What makes you so sure the Christian belief is the true one?

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Religion, philosophy, spirituality, personal wisdom from life experience..... Which one is more influential in one's life? ........ Personal wisdom from life experience. Why? Because it was created by the individual. A person's personal wisdom from life experience may be influenced by outside "forces" but experience will override. A person's personal wisdom or relative truth is right. This truth is malleable as time goes on and experiences help us learn new lessons. Relative truth is connected to a person's life experience so it is their reality which is similar but always unique to the person.



People can debate and argue points of one's ideas but at the end of the day no one knows enough to flat out declare someone is "WRONG.". We only know what is relative. Even at present, science is relative to the times. Absolute truth or reality is the opposite of relative truth. Relative truth is relative to time and space, therefore, Absolute truth is NOT associated with time and space. Absolute truth withstands the test of time and doesn't change... Meaning: All discoveries would have to be made and cannot be affected by someone's perception. Since every human colors the world with their personal perception and there is so much left to be know even in science, one can conclude people in space and time cannot know the Absolute Truth.



There is only ONE even if our CNS's tell us differently... Science says we are all ONE.

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they are arrogant and irrational and all think that they are THE ONE right way of being...they believe all others will be cast into hell for all eternity.

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Not the most enlightened view, but thanks nonetheless.

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Translation = read the last page of the Book , In Summary it means If you change anything in this book you'll get your's in the end ( And Not the way you wanted it ) .

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I'm afraid I don't follow.

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Book of rev : / Last page of the Bible , Add nothing to the Book or take anything out / RE: Banned from the Bible scriptures and so forth .

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The religion you are is based on where you were born? Are you forgetting about all of the converts (whether to Islam, Catholicism, etc.)? However, it is true that some faiths (Jews and Hindus come to mind) are strongly connected with ethnicity.

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I am referring to the religion you start of with. Anyone can convert to and from anything nowadays, true enough. But people converting this way and that surely undermines the validity of any of their beliefs? If a Jew converts to Catholicism, and a Catholic to Judaism Someone's got to be wrong.

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No, I do not see that way. Whatever people believe doesn't change the truth (if a group of people think that there are green elephants who live in the sea does not make it fact!). But yes, not all religions can be right (sorry, I am not a universalist). However, they all seem to have at least a grain of truth.

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"Whatever people believe doesn't change the truth" One could just as easily say that many people believing in God doesn't mean God is true, by the same argument surely.

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Yes, they certainly could. But as G.K. Chesterton glibly said, "if there were no God, there would be no atheists" (sorry, I just had to use that quote!).

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No one has the Absolute truth .... Why? We are relative to time and space ...... Relative to one's perception of the world, his/her life experiences. Truth is reality and reality is also relative. There is no REAL right or even wrong. That doesn't change the value of debate and discussion.

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