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WizGeezer WizGeezer 56-60, M 14 Answers Apr 22 in Politics

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Yep. We ain't the good guys anymore. I've been reading Kill Anything That Moves. Heartbreaking!

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I was just watching a YouTube video interviewing the author and he worked on the face-to-face interviews for that book for 12 years! He traveled all over Vietnam and interviewed many Vietnam vets in America. Actually, as bad as that was I'm almost more sickened by the horrific birth defects of Iraq from our use of HUNDREDS OF TONS of depleted uranium. Shouldn't that be a war crime?

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There was never a good reason to invade Iraq or Afghanistan. I would imagine our soldiers will suffer more from those wars than the Vietnam vets have.

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ba<x>sed on what?

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Engineering the rise and sustaining of the Nazi regime in Germany, CIA Assassination of JFK, Vietnam war 'kill anything that moves' policy, 9/11 false flag op, Afghanistan and Iraq wars with the use of depleted uranium, toppling foreign government, supporting Latin American death squads, CIA selling arms and importing drugs to support black ops, etc., etc., etc.

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Well, that would assume belief in all the above stated. And I don't buy conspiracy theories for JFK, 9/11 or much else. Yes, our government is neither innocent nor blameless, but then neither is any other so I don't think we've earned any special monikers.

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You don't need to believe 'conspiracy theories' for most of my cited points. Vietnam war 'kill anything that moves' policy is well documented in the book 'KILL ANYTHING THAT MOVES, The Real American War in Vietnam' Based on classified documents and first-person interviews by Nick Turse, Winner of the Ridenhour Prize for Reportorial Distinction. USA's use of depleted uranium in Iraq is well documented. Just look it up. The CIA toppling of government is in the history books, also not a conspiracy theory. Ronald Reagan's/Oliver North's Iran Contra scandal of importing drugs and selling arms is again no secret conspiracy theory but was on the front pages of newspapers at the time.

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You leave out the CIA/JFK conspiracy and the 9/11 conspiracy theories you previously mentioned. Vietnam was a war (semantics aside); we're naïve to assume there are rules of any kind associated with such atrocity. If you want to look into dangerous governments, look at some African countries, look at any dictatorship; the US isn't special.

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You said that you didn't buy conspiracy theories. I said that most of my points were NOT conspiracy theories and restated my NON-CONSPIRACY THEORY points on purpose to make just that point and I left out conspiracy theory points on purpose for just that reason. There are rules associated with war. The Geneva Conventions comprise four treaties, and three additional protocols, that establish the standards of international law for the humanitarian treatment of war. The Nuremberg principles were a set of guidelines for determining what constitutes a war crime. From 29 October to 7 December 1945, an American military tribunal in Manila tried General Tomoyuki Yamashita ("The Tiger of Malaya" "The Beast of Bataan") for war crimes relating to the Manila Massacre and many atrocities in the Philippines and Singapore against civilians and prisoners of war, such as the Sook Ching massacre, and sentenced him to death. When the My Lai massacre came to the attention of the American public and the US Military did it's own investigation, they found that the murder of civilians, women, children, BABIES, elderly in My Lai style massacres was typical and pervasive throughout Vietnam based on the orders from the top to "kill anything that moves" from Military Commander William Westmoreland and from body count quotas from Robert McNamara United States Secretary of Defense. The US Army did it's own internal WHITEWASH 'investigation' and classified the results to bury them as they realized that their war crimes were just as if not more heinous than any war crimes anywhere in history and were perpetrated and encouraged from the top down. They killed civilians for fun, tortured civilians for fun, killed babies for fun, gang raped young girls and women and then killed them and their families for fun, they collected souvenirs of the dead, such as ears, noses, penises, scalps, and fingers, for fun. I urge you to read the book or listen to the audio book from your library if you think that we were not extraordinarily evil in the Vietnam war ... 'Kill Anything That Moves: The Real American War in Vietnam' by Nick Turse (December 31, 2013). When atrocities were complained about by soldiers, other soldiers warned them to shut up or they'd be killed and often they were to shut them up. When complaints made it to top brass, the concern of the top brass was not to reform the behavior of their fellow West Point commanding officers and soldiers or to start following the Geneva Conventions but to prevent the news from getting out to the American public. So it's okay for us to stand in judgement of a Japanese General who slaughters civilians and put him to death, but when we do the exact same God damned thing, it's perfectly acceptable to let him live out his retirement in the lap of luxury as a distinguished and highly regarded gentleman and war hero, is that what you think?

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I am well aware there are man-made rules to war. What I meant is that we're naiive to assume we can engage in such atrocity with anything like civilized structure. I am a great believer in the harshest punishment of the truly cruel, but there's a certain psychological aspect that needs to be examined to. Be a monster, but not an untamed monster? Kill these people but not those people? Carry out these orders but refrain from following through if it means doing something worse than simple killing? Vietnam was a foreign, unfamiliar place with were no cut and dry rules at ground zero. Who was the enemy? The uniformed guy carrying a rifle or the child boarding a helicopter with a bomb strapped to her? I believe in following the rules of war at all levels, but it's more a wish than an expectation that they'll be truly followed. We just got over a president who did everything he could to skirt the Geneva Convention rules in order to detain and torture prisoners. What expectation can we have for 18-year old men dropped in hostile territory with no map, literally or figuratively?

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I agree with you that war isn't a precise business when it comes to sorting out who should be killed and who shouldn't, but these 18 year old soldiers in Vietnam were given incentives to ignore any distinctions between Viet Cong and non-Viet Cong. The generals wanted bodies and they didn't care whose bodies they were as long as they were Vietnamese.

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Well, I can't argue with that.

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:^D

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6 More Responses

Vile Empire..?<br />
Veil Empire..?<br />
Live Empire..?<br />
Levi Empire..?

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no just the motto from " land of the free" to "home of the slaves"

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Nice one!

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'America' is the name of two continents, not of any empire

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You are correct, sorry. *[The United States of] America.*

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I would say yes.

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I was thinking the Salvation Army

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What America has always been Empire! might of well enjoy life while the Empire last.

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I'd love that. I always like the villain.

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No, I kind of believe all empires are evil, America being no exception to this. Anyway, this empire will collapse soon enough.

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I think Abyssal Plain would be better.

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LOL All empires on this earth are evil... That's why they become Empires... they out evil the opposition..

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I pledge allegiance to the flag of The Evil Empire......hmmm, yah, its kind of catchy

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lol

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