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They have dished it out and I've taken it but now they are messing with my money that I work for and they hold out on me alot so I'm thinking of leaving for "real" work, like tomorrow. LOL
imahag imahag 46-50, F 15 Answers Jun 24, 2009

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Don't burn any bridges....even if you never intend to go back to work there, you have a resume, and they can be a reference....and, with the economy the way it is, we all need all the help we can get!

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Don't stoop to their level. Give a notice. It'll give you chance to find another job while still getting paid... assuming they can figure out how to do that. <br />
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Seems you can report them for not paying you correctly... I'm sure th IRS frowns on employers messing that up. <br />
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If they are as bad as you say, be prepared... they'll likely fire you anyway.

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ALWAYS...repeat: ALWAYS give notice! Here's why:<br />
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First, you should have a new job lined up already. Giving notice to your current employer shows your NEW employer that you are professional and courteous and says you will likely treat them with the same respect. That scores points right up front, before they even make the decision to hire you.<br />
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Second, when you give notice, be prepared to potentially be escorted to the door IMMEDIATELY by security personnel, if you have them. Some employers have an immediate dismissal policy for employees who give notice. No problem...YOU were the professional in the deal who DID give notice.<br />
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Third: In the case where they might keep you for the two weeks notice period...it allows them to smoothly transition to get a new employee...perhaps have you train them...and most importantly: What if someday the tables turn and you want to return to work there? NEVER, NEVER, NEVER burn bridges, just like unicorn told you, above. It may suck...but SUCK IT UP...this is YOUR FUTURE you are investing in...U can survive a lousy 2 weeks.

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Don't burn any bridges. Yes, give notice especially if you need them as a reference. If you don't, and they've been treating you like crap, then just don't show up one day. With the job I have now, if I didn't need the money, I'd just not show up one day, no call, no email. That would feel SOOOO good!

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You should ALWAYS give notice. Never burn a bridge .... even if they have it coming. Remember, the feet you step on today might be connected to the *** you'll have to kiss tomorrow! <br />
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Besides... take it from someone who was in personnel for 24 years ... it goes in your record and is shared in reference checking many times... so, while the company will quickly get over you not giving notice ... you, on the other hand, may just wind up screwing yourself.<br />
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Sorry .... but that's how it is in the real world! Good luck with another job. Hope it's better.

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I'm not sure what kind of job you work for... but If I were you I would call the district manager and notify him that you are being treated very unequal... discrimination! lol, and let the District manager know that's the reason why you will no longer work for the company.<br />
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- if your District manager understands the situation then everything should be in good terms... make sure you keep that person as a contact as your reference for your job =)

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yes, you should always give notice. It sounds like they may have been unfair to you, but even if that is so, and you think they deserve for you to just leave, you should still give your notice because leaving on bad terms could hurt you in your search for the next job.

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Get another job before you quit the current one.<br />
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I know someone that just quit one day. She's regretted it for the past 30 years.

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Yes...give a notice. I don't know how long you've worked with them, but if its past 6 months then you'll need them as a reference for another job. I agree with one of the posters, don't stoop to their level. I got into a situation like this once, wish I had handled it a little better.

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I was once in that position where i wanted to leave a job asap - i just wanted out of there - i felt i was being really messed around and the managing director was being really picky about everything because i had gone from doing a lot of unpaid overtime to just doing my basic work day. Anyway - I wanted to leave and as it was a professional job I knew i couldnt just walk out - so i decided that i would put all of my anger into my resignation letter...i wrote a scathing letter...a work of art really. But - i decided in the end that i would be the bigger person and not stoop to their level and nit-pick - so my letter set out the date that i was leaving and how i had enjoyed working there and how i had learnt a lot etc - your standard resignation letter. In the end I felt a lot better that i had behaved properly...that I hadnt allowed myself to be caught up in the pettiness of the whole situation. If i were you i would give my notice and use the time to find something better.

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Yeah you should...even though they suck big monkey balls...<br />
just be straight up and straight forward and blunt. :)

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