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With ever mounting costs of school loans, I'm contemplating whether or not to pursue my doctorate degree in health sciences. The field is lucrative and will definitely offer my family and me better financial security, but I keep looking at the amount of classes and money it would take. **Note: This is also a childhood dream that my grandparents have always wanted. I'm from the inner-city and I grew up believing that no one attended college unless they were rich. I am also the only - ONLY - person in my family to have gone this far in completing my Masters.
Orkaprol Orkaprol 41-45, F 9 Answers Jul 16, 2012

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Yes..you can never be too educated..I admire you

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You're on the right track.<br />
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If the degree will wind up paying for itself, sure. If you can't afford to put in the time or pay for it, that's a valid and huge consideration.

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what do *you* want? if you have the means and the ability and the desire, go for the brass ring.<br />
...<br />
i imagine you could walk out the door and start making big bucks with your masters. unless you're in a hurry to put up a picket fence and get a dog, a car, and have some babies, why trade academia for the daily grind? <br />
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these are the best years of you life, so why switch gears unless there is a clear need to do so?

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Well, I already have 4 babies and I approach my studies as a means to learn more, further credentials, and to set the expectation for my children. I'm hesitant only in that it will take even more time away from my children (mentally), but in the end, I'll be able to provide for my entire family. My husband owns his own business and I think he wants his wife - entire wife - back now.

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ok, so it isn't a choice between school and settling down.
if you want it and you can do it, you'll be pushing 50 by the time you're done. 15-20 years to reap the benefits, max. so, how big a difference is there between the 9-5 and the paper chase? it might be nice to have some quality time with the kiddlings before they grow up and move out, assuming the career world is more family-friendly (oh, really?) than graduate studies

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Yes

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I am a firm believer in higher education. So I may be biased when I say abso-damn-tutly you should. :)

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