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darkice123 darkice123 36-40, M 10 Answers Apr 23, 2013 in Community

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Heck no. It serves many reasons. It expands their likes, looks good for college..gets them fit, teaches team work and strength. <br />
Noway, that would be a huge mistake.

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I don't think everybody likes to play sport, but I feel they should have some sort of exercise at schools. My daughter hated sports such as basketball, softball, soccer etc but loved swimming and running, so I think it's how the sports is catagorized.

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No never! Sports is a must. Look at the kids wieght while the schools have sports. What would it be like if they didn't. I don't mean to sound mean.

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Yes if you want huge medical bills in 40 years.

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no

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No ... clearly exercise is a must

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No. Not sports, not art.

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Yes, if you are talking about sports teams. I would however keep intramural sports and physical education classes because they promote good health and do not suffer from the detriments I am about to discuss (if done correctly):<br />
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1) It is a waste of money; in terms of funding it focuses a huge amount on the disproportionate few who will have a career in the field of professional sports. The fact is the money spent in this area, on maintaining fields and equipment, paying coaches, hiring buses, and so on, could be put to better use elsewhere and could benefit far more students, especially in the present climate of budget cuts, where not only subjects like the arts are suffering but, more worryingly, special needs students at both ends of the spectrum are having their programs cut as well. And most of these student athletes aren't going to make it professionally or continue in their sport at all. <br />
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2) It is elitist. I remember school sports being so different than how I played with my friends. With my friends we'd just grab a soccer ball, construct makeshift goal posts, and pretty much anyone could play as long as they knew the game. Even though we got a little rough, it was always friendly and fun with kids from multiple grades, who didn't even know each other, coming to play. But high school sports were different. I'd never have been allowed on any team because, as was made clear to me over the years, I lacked the skill and natural physical ability. My sibling would also not be allowed because even though her technical abilities for her sport were excellent, once it became contact, she was too small. Thus it is with most teens. There is no point in showing up because you know you won't be picked. No matter how hard you work it can't happen. <br />
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3) It promotes negative values by promoting a focus on winning at all costs, exclusivity, and inflated egos. When I started high school there was no football team, but mid-way through one was founded. The change was startling. Suddenly there was this new class of student above everyone else and, frankly, many of them were bullies. They strutted around the school as if they owned the place (this was definitely new behaviour). Not to mention the general attitude in sport - it's all about winning, winning, winning. And you might be interested to know that sport doesn't have the positive benefits that are often claimed.<br />
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4) Disruptions to academics. Aside from sapping funding, the sheer amount if time sport takes up in the life of a student can harm their academic potential with all the practices taking up homework time and the games taking away from class time. Not to mention the fact that any coaches who also teach (some of them are decent teachers) will also be absent and substitutes are frequently just glorified babysitters. Finally, sports are largely the reason that high schools start so early, in defiance of research that shows that students would benefit from later

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