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Obviously, this is on my mind right now, but I have been thinking for the last twenty years that I had a better work ethic, was more driven, less frightened, less lazy, and had better control of all my faculties, mental and physical, at seventeen than at twenty-one. And, although I thoroughly loved what I studied, I had less sense for getting life-type processes done afterward than I did before I went off to school.
TheSquirrel TheSquirrel 46-50, M 5 Answers Nov 12, 2012 in Education

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The big U was directly responsible for my career. I was very well prepared and used my knowledge every day. Most importantly, I learned how to think.

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Honestly both. once I grauated I worked my *** off for 2/3 years. Without the stress so it's a good question.

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I feel equally unprepared for work. You learn a lot of stuff that you will never need again in your life. What you need is practical experience and that was exactly what the university didn't offer. The whole system seem to be designed in a way to make learning unattractive and unnecessarily hard. I feel like all my graduation proves is, that I can learn complex stuff under really bad circumstances and then manage to remember at least half of it, just before I erase it from my brain to learn the next topic.

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This is what I fear. Thanks for the excellent description. You do write well. I am serious.

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I didn't start college until after I comleted three years in the army and I worked all the time I went to school.

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I knew a number of former military people when I was in school. I say the same thing my mom said about the guys back from Korea in the 50s -- you guys were the best students of all of us.

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Well, going to university meant I had to get a job...so, I'm not sure one really prepared for the other.

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