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greensmile97 greensmile97 16-17, F 3 Answers Nov 1, 2012 in Community

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Between liquid and gas the temperature could increase. <br />
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It would in a suitably enclosed space e.g., a boiler. When the temperature rises past the point of evaporation, so does the pressure in the vessel. The boiling point is when the pressure of vapourisation is equal to the atmospheric pressure or of that in a closed vessel. <br />
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The planet is just a big vessel too. Change altitude, change atmospheric pressure change boiling point. In fact, just change pressure, cos that's the important bit. A day by the sea at 1034mBar or 980mBar will alter the boiling point of your water (and we're assuming the ambient temperature is the same both days). 1 Bar= 1000mBars= about 14.71 lb/sq inch.<br />
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In a boiler at 175 lbs/ sq inch, water will be boiling at 192 centigrade. At the top of Ben Nevis, 1344m, it is 95.4 centigrade given 12.12lbs/sq inch ( 836 mBar) atmospheric pressure. (Comparative values from online charts, not claculation, and therefor approx)

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Erm the air is relevant but it would be a half gas bubble slowly rising into he air and dissolving on the surface and the tem is important too

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it's relative to pressure.....

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