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A couple of years ago, i read that when foster children turn 18 they have no where to go. It didn't matter if they were still in school or working or whatever, at 18 they had to leave the foster home. I've thought on this for a long time and wonder what happens to these young adults? Is there any place they can go and live and find the support they need to finish their education and get a good strong foundation for their life? I'm sure many of them do finish their education and go on with their life. I guess I'm really just interested in learning more about foster children and possibly becoming a foster parent in the near future. I even have ideas of one day opening a home for unwanted foster children and possibly providing a home environment so they can continue their education without the extra hardships. Drop me a line if you have any info you feel might be useful. Thanks.
sherrib2518 sherrib2518 36-40, F 13 Answers Jul 4, 2009

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ummm... I was a foster kid. we are no different that a regular kid. However, we don't get the privilege of some things such as someone trying pay for our college, or support from family.<br />
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I think it would be awesome to open a center for foster kids<br />
so they can continue their education. let's face it some don't make out of the system and they just end up in jail or prison.<br />
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we need an advocate and someone with a backbone<br />
to guide us through life .

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Comp, years to make plans... who plans out what they're going to do when they are 18. how many 18 year old's do you know who can make plans about the rest of their life, most are stuck in a world where they need to deal with only school... <br />
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most are still debating on whether or not to go to college<br />
what the hell have some compassion man.

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Just like any other child (at least in the USA) when you turn 18 years of age your parents are no longer legally obliged to provide you with anything. There are some states where a parent must continue to provide you with shelter and sustenance until you complete high school or turn 19 whichever comes first. Foster children (my sister was a foster in my family then we adopted her) can certainly continue to spend time in the foster family's home if the family so desires. After all at that point you are no longer a 'foster child' but an adult guest in their home.

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I totally disagree with "Comprehensive2" ( doesn´t sound too much like the username).<br />
Just because you are not legally obligated doesn´t mean you don´t have moral obligations with the children you raise.<br />
The law can not tell you what to do in that regard or how to feel. <br />
Just like with your own children if you feel you want to be part of their lives after they turn 18, do so. Be a guide, a mentor , a friend. Kicking them out just because they are 18 is not an option that must be mandated by law. If you love them, keep them in your life.

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I agree with LiamOyer. NO one at 18 is ready to move out. Its a really sad story for foster kids. But I'm pretty sure that kids in the system get their college tuition paid for and even extra money. This girl I knew did and even got a free laptop. But even that's not enough for some kids. Some don't have the love and support to strive for more and end up getting into trouble. Its not fair to boot kids out at 18. Come on, I know more successful kids who still live with their parents at the age of 25. I think the government should support the foster kids for a few extra years because before high school, no one is contemplating what they are going to do with their lives. Its really hard out there and even harder now a days.

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Foster kids are no different than other kids who turn 18. GET OUT!! You're a legal adult and it's not like turning 18 snuck up on anybody. They would have had years to make plans for their future and if they didn't then that's on them. And I mean all children turning 18.

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my parents ran a group foster home for 20 years and when the children turned 18 they are considered adult. if my parents still wanted to help them out...and they did...and if the young adults needed the help..no could say other wise. at 18 they are out of the system.

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i am doing a research about this at school and my question is what happens to unadopted children? and How many children are abandoned each year in canada? thanks.

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The Foster child we took in Turned 18 and just wanted us for our address and the monthly check. She used us and the system. They gave her money to use for graduation such as a dress or dinner. She used the money for a hotel and party . She would call to see if money was here all the time and not stay with us.I will NEVER take in anybody else.

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Wow Comp you didnt just say that, Look its true that maybe even your family will put you out at 18 which trust it sucks, but no plans on there life and how its gonna turn out. I personally was looking to adopt, i dont want a lil kid tho, pardon my writing i aint one of those parents thats can we say proper to the T... I have 5 sons and im looking for someone to fit in with them there ages are between 19 - 11 , as you can see a baby wouldnt really fit in, so i asked a question on ask.com which lead me to here, there are ppl looking for teenagers but there's just so many restrictions on how things should be, which is holding me back, almost makes me wanna stand out front from the building and ask (hey where you just booted)... smh there has to be a better way...

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The picture remains grim, generally. I direct a foster care clearinghouse for youth with disabilities, and for this group which is about 50 percent of foster kids, only 3 percent make it college, though 70 percent want to go, very few graduate, many are homeless or in prison shortly after emancipating...but there are also some positive things in the works--federal legislation to extend time in care if youth are in training or school, more help to kin caregivers, etc. You can learn more at www.dredf.org and go to Clearinghouse.

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The sad thing is that foster care is not what it should be in the United States (or most anywhere) it is often ripe with corruption and greed (not all mind you just often). They get sizable funding from the state and all to often do not actually CARE for whom they are giving the living space to. I read yesterday about a young man turning 18 in a few days. He is Autistic and is an illegal immigrant. so when his "child" status becomes non existent he will be removed from the system and put on the streets. he has the social, life, and communication skills of a preschooler. his options will be deportation, being institutionalized or starve in the streets.<br />
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Ive also taken in post foster children now as young adults and the severity of their situations are down right terrible. Like the last one I took in, She was a 20 year old that had been in a couple different homes before 18 and at 18 her present was one last night with a roof over her head. she has been "couch surfing" since. She has epilepsy so has severe troubles getting work. She has her high school diploma but had to have me read and spell words for her consistently. And it seems to be an all to common story line. Ive had 3 of such young adults through here in the last 6 months. 2 of the 3 were females and they both said that it was the first time they felt safe and didn't have to give up sex in order to stay somewhere.<br />
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It is in my strong opinion with the knowledge I have of the system that Child Protective Services and foster care both need severely reworked in the before, during, and after stages.

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I have worked with foster kids for many years and one thing I have noticed is that agencies push to get foster parents to take care of special need kids without fully explaining all of their diagnoses and consequences thereof. Then, the foster parents complain that these kids are doing bad things and wonder why. Let's see...a lot are diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder and many others have ADHD and ADD and have difficulty staying on task. Yet, do these foster parents REALLY understand how to work with these kids? From my experience working with foster parents, many have very little idea of what they are getting into.

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A story was done on this before. Yes, they are legally on thier own at 18. I personally if I were a foster parent would always be their family.<br />
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How could anyone not be? I guess many foster parents are in it for the money. I have heard many horror stories about foster care. I have always wondered if the system would take a short, fat, old white guy as a foster parent.

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