Post
Experience Project iOS Android Apps | Download EP for your Mobile Device
Where do these notions of psychological health come from and how do they get formed? Why, for example, do we consider bipolar people to be abnormal? Is it because they might hurt others? Or because they talk funny? Or might hurt themselves?
wundayatta wundayatta 56-60, M 7 Answers Jun 1, 2010

Your Response

Cancel

It is all dependent on how the patient feels. If they believe their symptoms have disrupted their lives than they are in need of help. People who are easily stressed out, and have poor coping skills, and who are chronically disrupted by the consequences of their choices are signs of a psychologically un-healthy person. People who are healthy have an internal locus of control, have good coping skills despite events, and who are not chronically disrupted by events or consequences of their choices. Psychologist know who is un-healthy and who are. It is very clear. I listed them above and these characteristics are in the research material. It is possible to become healthy after chronic issues in the past.<br />
<br />
BTW it is not normal to have such high highs and such low lows as in bipolar disorder. And the proof is in how much the "bipolar" person suffers relating to the consequences of their actions. For instance, high highs and low lows affect how other people relate to them and so chronic relationship issues might take place. This could be a sore point for the sufferer. There are physical, chemical abnormalities related to mental illness. This is why bipolar sufferers must be treated with medicine. Some bipolar people do not recognize the depth of their disorder but the people who grew up with them and who love them know all too well. This means there is insight deficit. Sometimes we must listen to our loved ones when they try to give us insight into how our behaviors affect them.

Best Answer

What if there is a bipolar person who believes the high highs and low lows contribute to their quality of life? What it, in some way, they like these feelings or find them instructive? Sure, they are different, and you can apply the term "abnormal" to them, but does abnormal necessarily mean unhealthy?

Best Answer

Okay. As far as I know (which is not a lot), a diagnosis of mental illness is based upon symptoms which any "well" human being might experience (eg. "Impulsivity"), but the symptoms always have to be of a severity which interferes with the functioning of that person in society.<br />
<br />
Eg. if those symptoms make it impossible for the patient to build durable and healthy relationships with other people. <br />
<br />
I was diagnosed with "major depression" because I was thinking of killing myself several times a day, and was actually making concrete plans.<br />
<br />
Medically, I am no longer considered to be depressed, although there are times when I feel "low".<br />
<br />
I have two close friends in RL who are bipolar, and they are unable to hold jobs even though they are very talented human beings. For me, personally, somebody who is psychologically healthy is somebody who can cope with all the normal stresses and strains of "life". And even the abnormal stress! The question is, are we merely reacting to things which happen to us, or are we resilient enough, emotionally, to choose how we respond to those things in a way which doesn't harm our interests?<br />
<br />
HTH.<br />
<br />
AP

Best Answer

Ok AP, so your standard is functioning in society. You must have some normative idea of what is effective social functioning. Can you describe that?<br /><br />
<br /><br />
You also imply another standard -- not harming our own interests. This seems troublesome to me because who decides what your interests are? I agree that there are many situations when we feel someone is incompetent -- children and people with dementia, for example. <br /><br />
<br /><br />
Clearly, children and the elderly with dementia have either uninformed, or clouded thinking compared to most of us. Both have difficulty caring for themselves.<br /><br />
<br /><br />
So there's another standard -- ability to care for oneself. But how well? And who gets to decide what "well" is?

Best Answer

Here's another slant on this whole question: Years ago I went to a shrink for alcoholism. At first I knew him to be a sincere, caring, married man of about 42 with kids. He wore a suit (no tie) and had a lot of books on his shelf about substance abuse. By the time 3 years had passed he was turning up for our sessions in shorts and sandals with a good tan and was alluding to affairs with young men in Costa Rica. His eyes were red most of the time and he seemed to be having trouble concentrating. I had stopped drinking. About a year later, after I had moved to another town, I learned that he died of a heart attack. Yeah, sure. <br />
<br />
We can theorize and philosophize about the human condition but no one can ever really know what is going on in another person's mind.

Best Answer

No - we all think differently, so there's no Standard to go by. Without a standard, you cannot declare anything. So, the crazies win *party*

Best Answer

Win *party*? What are we? Politicians?

Best Answer

Related Questions