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Kmade Kmade 18-21, M 2 Answers May 24 in Community

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Everything is ALL things, anything is one of a number of things. Imagine a woman standing in front of a wardrobe she can say, "I haven't got anything to wear." but not "I haven't got everything to wear," but saying "I can wear everything" or "I can wear anything" are both correct but have a different implication. So in order to make a definition difference between the two words involves not just an understanding of the conceptual references of the word to both group and individual ob<x>jects but also to usage and context.

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Reading your question I understand completely, I am also glad at your reservoir of knowledge, you didn't show too much here, but I can tell....I can tell ;)

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If this is a college thing you may want to check out the usage of much vs many, countable vs uncountable nouns and some vs any (someone, anyone, something, anything)

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It wasn't directed towards that, but I was curious how people perceived the two. I was expecting very different answer from both you and the other responder, I don't know what I was expecting but it was not as more formal and literal as a response you've given. It would be fun to define the above examples you gave though, many of those words work similarly and differently at the same time, I guess it all comes down to context....everything comes down to context haha

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grammar is a serious business.. SERIOUS I say!! lol :D

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My definition you mean? If all that existed were 3 cubes, anything would be one or more of them, but there is none that it can't be. Everything would be all three cubes.

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What a lovely and logical response. That works really well, my man. I was actually think in a more familiar rhetoric because the two seem to coincide, completely oblivious to your train of though, interesting none the less. :D

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