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Sorrentina Sorrentina 41-45, F 8 Answers Aug 21 in Community

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It's on! Yet it must go off in a few minutes. I have to go catch a train

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;) take care my friend..

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I will. I'm leaving now to catch a train. Enjoy your evening and winter and tomorrow while I enjoy my daylight and summer and today!

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:) those role will change soon my friend!! :P

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As long as the Earth keeps spinning and keeps falling around the Sun!

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I hope it will keep turning! :)

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Unless we collide with some rogue planet, it will. And if a collision happens, the planet will melt and/or be shattered, so we will all die a horrible death, so we won't care afterward if it spins. When it is all over and something new coalesces and/or the Earth cools, I suspect it will spin -- yet maybe backwards. Venus spins in the opposite direction as the other planets, so maybe it got hit long ago. Uranus is tilted heavily, maybe it got hit long ago.

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Wow! That's weird... I still think the summer will come here before everything blows up though! ;)

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Yet some collisions are good things. Scientists think a Mars-sized object hit the Earth in its infancy (over 4 billion years ago?). The two merged into one, yet sent a huge amount of molten debris into orbit, which accreted to form the Moon. Back then the Moon was close and revolved fast around the Earth, and the Moon spun much faster on its axis. So the month was short and the lunar day shorter. Also, the Earth spun much faster on its axis, so the day was shorter. The Moon slowly drifted away and took longer to go around the Earth, so the month grew longer. The effects of tidal forces caused both objects to spin more slowly. The day grew longer, and is still growing longer today!

Eventually, the Moon's spin slowed enough and its orbital period lengthened enough, so that the time it takes for the Moon to make one rotation on its axis matched the time it takes for the Moon to go around the Earth. This effect occurs also with Jupiter and its 4 large moons, so is nothing unique to Earth. Hence, when seen from the Earth, the Moon appears not to rotate on its axis (yet it does appear to wobble a bit). Yet the Moon is still spinning, when seen from the Sun and stars. The lock between the orbital period of the Moon and its rotational period is a stable arrangement, since if the Moon started to spin faster or slower, tidal forces form the Earth would counteract this and bring it back to how it was (that is, locked).

The Moon is quite massive relative to the Earth, compared to most satellites of planets, so it has a great stabilizing effect on the Earth, and keeps its axis from wobbling too much. This produces stable climates and seasons, which allowed life, and later humans and our civilization, to evolve in a stable environment, for the most part. Without the Moon things might not be the same, and be more erratic. We might have life, but perhaps not advanced life?

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It's ok I'm back!!

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Sorry, wrong green light! :P

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Ok I'm going to bed. :(

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I don't know what to say...

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stalker!

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:) I miss him!

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awww....he will be back

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He is now!! ;)

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It's on and ready to go!

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:) still waiting...

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get his phone number and text him

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Quelle tu parle?

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Excusez-Mois, mas French est miserable

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Je suis d'accord avec toi! ;)

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You are...?

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Oui je le suis ..

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