Years ago people in the workforce referred to fellow employees with the formality and respect of Ms. or Mr. People took pride in their appearance. These days there is not a whole lot of class left among Americans. We have, in general, become common and crass.

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In the corporate culture in the United States, quite often co-workers will step on each-others backs to rise within the company and "friends" will back stab to try to take each-others jobs. Just as an example, I knew a fellow who refused to share useful information with any members of his department. He hoarded information, because it made him seem smarter and better than the others, and he was using it to get himself a promotion...even though it could have helped the company overall. <br />
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Then I knew a "friendly" group who got together and began to back-stab a girl who was of a different race. I had to say something to them and walk away.<br />
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You can make friends within a company, but it will usually be the small group of friends with whom you eat lunch.

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depends on what part of the country your working at and also what company....ive been with right unfriendly companies and then some very nice ones...also very much culteral

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I've been working in America for 56 years. It's not the work place it's the people in it. Your looking through the wrong lense. See the difference you want to be and you will be the difference you want to see.

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i believe it has more to do with the predominate culture of the people in general. after all most work places are merely microcosms of the society at large. And of course the administrative and managerial policies and rules play a big part in the overall attitude of the workers. But that aside, i think making such a blanket statement as "American work places" would suggest that one has worked at or at least had some experience with, or done some research regarding a large number of American work places. If that is not the case, then one can only speak of ones own experiences. Don't u agree<br />
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I beg your pardon imor, my intention was not to in any way devalue your experiences, in fact, i said so very clearly in the last sentence of my response that one speaks from ones own experiences, isn't that what you're saying. And to be clear, my response to your question was ba<x>sed on your phrasing of the question which was phrased as a matter of fact and not of opinion. no offence intended.

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No. I disagree. I think people should be allowed to state their opinion ba<x>sed on their own observations and experiences and solicit feedback on how their perception may be right or wrong.I shouldn't have to have worked in every single company in the U.S. or written a master thesis on a topic in order to have an opinion on it.<br /><br />
However, I have worked at 5 different locations in the US and 4 different locations abroad, so I probably have enough experience to identify a trend.

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Americans are more private than people of other countries. We have our “own little worlds” and rarely come out of them. This makes us appear as being aloof or unfriendly even though inside we’re not. <br />
At my workplace it is MANDATORY to be friendly with each other! We are required to say “hello” or “hi” (with a smile) when interacting with a customer of fellow employee or when even passing by them. To not do so brings a reprimand.

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I think Americans are taught to mind their own business. This mean's not talking to anyone unless needed, ignore the problems of others, and to avoid conflict that draws attention to themselves. I've lived in a few different countries myself, and I've noticed that Americans are very "to the point" HAVE to be on time and make their schedules very strict. They don't greet each other the same way as any other country. Unless they have a relationship with you they ignore socializing with others at all costs just to get things done.

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Yeah, I get that impression too.<br /><br />
They only talk to each other when they need to. Not because they are interested in getting to know you or see how you are doing. There's a big separation between friends and co-workers in the US. This didn't appear to be the case in other countries where I worked. I think the US corporate culture tends to encourage this separation in the interest of productivity and avoiding law suits.

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It would depend on where you work, some places being friendlier than others. And the French reputation for rudeness comes from the perception that they are rude to everyone but other French ever since they became a second-rate power

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I worked at a lot of companies (mostly tech companies in California, Michigan and New England) and they all pretty much ranged from unfriendly to cut-throat. The "good" places were places where people would just exchange empty greetings. The "bad" places were places where people were just plain mean to each other. Did you ever work at a place where ALL of your co-workers shook your hand every morning and asked how you were? I'm just saying the French get a bad rap.

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