This is a vast oversimplification of a process that is not fully understood by neuro scientists, but I hope it will help. The majority who suffer from chemical depression have a problem with seratonin.<br />
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Imagine a three step process: a synapse transmitter that fires, a pool of seratonin that conducts, and a synapse receiver that takes in seratonin. Different prescribed drugs will affect one part of the process more than others. If your transmitter and conductor are working fine but the receiver is not, the flow of seratonin is stopped. If the anti-depressant prescribed for you tends to enhance the transmitter, it won't help, and can throw off the balance even further. Obviously the reverse could be true. If your transmitter is not firing off seratonin, a drug that increases the receiver will only make it worse. <br />
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Imagine an analogy of a diabetic. Some have too much sugar, some not enough. But what if doctors could not perform a test to check the sugar level? They would have to guess, and monitor closely the reaction. <br />
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In my opinion, the biggest mistake people make in taking anti-depressants is not seeking a psychiatrist for help. The old stereotype is a beady-eyed man with a goatee wanting you to lay on a couch and talk about your mother for six years. But for the past twenty years, psychiatrists are all about brain chemistry. They are highly trained to recognize certain behaviors and patterns so they can prescribe the correct anti-depressant. GPs are not trained to do this, they tend to pick one and hope it works. People resist this idea, they tend to think psychiatrists are over-educated over-priced hoakum witch doctors. They are not. Most are worth the added expense. The majority of psychiatrists have an initial one hour meeting, then will have follow up appointments that may only be 15 minutes long. They are also better at understanding how the drug they prescribe will combine with any other medications you may be taking. <br />
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Anti-depressants can help quite a bit, but you also have to take responsibility for your condition. If you abuse alcohol and drugs and drink a gallon of coffee a day you're still going to get depressed. Diet, exercise, regular routines all play a part in ending depression. Many people also need psychotherapy and/or support groups in conjunction with the drugs. Anti-depressants aren't "happy" pills that make your problems disappear. They aid your brain chemistry so you can be better equipped for decision making. You can resist bad thoughts more easily and embrace healthy thinking more often. But if you decide to be depressed, you will be, it's as simple as that.<br />
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Sorry I wrote a book. Hope this helps.

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This is a really great answer and your reasoning on meds is one of many reasons I've debated on getting help recently as I've seen bad things happen with it in people as well as hate taking meds since I was required to take a medication for several years when I was younger for another issue.

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Because people are different, drugs can have odd, even paradoxical side-effects.<br />
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For example, what is a typical drug given to someone with ADHD? A stimulant. While a stimulant would make someone without ADHD wired beyond belief, for someone who has ADHD, it has a calming effect.<br />
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Even over-the-counter medications can have paradoxical effects. A typical cold medicine can warn of BOTH drowsiness and nervousness as side effects.<br />
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Alcohol can make some people mellow, and some people violent.<br />
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The same principle holds true with antidepressants.

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Great descriptionAside from how they affect each person differently they can take up to 4 weeks to start working so you may go thru 3 weeks of side affects that go away and then you start to feel better, or have no side affects and find out it doesn't help or it can help for a while then stop working or it can make things worse. I t took me years to find what works for me and its 2 different medications that counter act the side affects of each other. And I'm still not 100% better but 80% is better than 5% functioning level.

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Simply put (as my doctor explained to me) is that when you are severely depressed, you don't even have the energy to contemplate suicide so as meds start helping they may bring you up enough to have energy to think suicidal thoughts but not up enough to feel good so in that case you need to discuss it with your doctor and may need a higher dose or different med.

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The best medicaments give only 10% of the cure,<br />
90% come from the patients' spiritual strength.<br />
Unfortunately, in the case of depression, man's mind <br />
is weakest!<br />
As for a heathy life and true healing, the advice stresses not<br />
on physical masures, but on spiritual efforts.<br />
Today, the mature humanity are getting better health<br />
through prayer, meditation, fasting, offering free services<br />
to the community by selfless love and faith in the bright <br />
future of the whole human race.

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See, I've tried most of that and I believe in prayer, but I do believe that there's more screwed up in the brain with depression and other mental disorders that while yes, prayer can do amazing things, but other stuff has to be done on top of helping others and meditating. Trust me, I've been about service since forever.

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I have been on several different anti-depressants, risperidone, amitryptaline, etc.... They didn't work for me so since i am now on xanax for anxiety that is all I take for depression as it seems to help me with that too. Be careful, just because someone prescribes something it doesn't in any way make it safe. If an anti-depressant is working the opposite way om you, see your doctor as soon as possible. The meds should help, not make it worse.

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It's only supposed to cause depression the first two weeks you start taking them, then everything should smooth itself out. They never worked for me though, and the withdrawal symptoms were not worth it. I'd get too depressed to get a prescription refilled and had withdrawal a few times...it was a nightmare. That said, I have a lot of friends who's antidepressant medication has helped them greatly and who find them really beneficial. It really depends on the individual.

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Antidepressants affect the chemistry of various neurotransmitters and transmission. Most specifically target seratonin...but not all. We know that low seratonin itself isnt necessarily a cause of all depression(patients that have low seratonin may never suffer clinical depression) but SSRIs do help a majority of depression patients. - As to your actual question: The drugs dont neccessarily cause depression...medical studies have to include all reported symptoms...which may require the makers to list depression as a side-effect. It also happens that the variety of similar class antidepressants do have differing effect in different people(we arent all exactly the same.."I know, duh!" is my reaction too!)...if you're on a drug and your depression worsens then it may be wise to change drugs(a difficult process...I know...I went through 3 prior medications before finding the one I take now which helps...a great deal). I also needed CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) before I showed any serious progress. The best results are when drugs are used in conjunction with talk therapy.

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