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FUDICULOUS FUDICULOUS 36-40, F 7 Answers Nov 5, 2012 in Religion

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Non-believers post a very large majority of the religious questions and they are meant to ridicule the faith of the believers. Then they resort to childish name calling and profanities. That's what I find offensive.

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Well we only resort to name calling when a believer refuses to accept reality and sound logical arguements. Won't make any difference of course, but when all else has failed , the rest will too.

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Name calling is often in the question but is rude and unnecessary no matter when it's used. I guess we should thank you for trying to save us from our lack of reality and logic, but that probably won't happen until you thank us for trying to save your soul. :)

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Prove a soul exists, then we can talk. You understand being objective and skeptic just like I do. Well maybe not JUST like I do, but still. Both of us don't believe everything we are told, the reasons why, when filtered through logic, will give us a very good idea how close to reality the claim is.

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Science of the Soul: Scientific Evidence of the Human Soul by Kevin T Favers

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Flawed premise, cancelling out quantum relativity. You can't just exclude quantum matter because it disproves your premise. Even if we accept the not proven concept that free will can't exist in our minds naturally(really?) then all we can conclude is that. A thesis to prove a soul can not make the assumption "spiritual" and "soul" exist. You feed logic into the arguement and examine what comes out.
It goes without saying, his "scientific" thesis has not been accepted by the scientific community, as the scientific method can't aptly be used. No surprise there.

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You are right on with this comment.

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Such religions in their infant years had executions for blasphemy, to question. This obviously led to a very strong belief that questioning was not just wrong, but deserving of punishment.



Deeply religious folks think freedoms of speech and expression should only apply in line with their backwards belief system.

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I don't subscribe to the 'flying spagetti monster' either

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The same reason certain people consider it offensive to proclaim my Faith in Jesus Christ.

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I think the problem that I have seen is just that secular people assume that we of Faith are extremist hypocrites like a few examples that pop up once in a while.

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Like what?

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For example:
"Deeply religious folks think freedoms of speech and expression should only apply in line with their backwards belief system."
He says deeply religious people. Well, the vast majority of deeply religious people that I know think just the opposite. They are patriots, and they know that God gave us all free will, that everyone is a sinner including themselves, and they try hard to live by the teaching of Christ. Matthew Chapter 7 is a lesson that many live by; they do not preach to every person they run into, they do not push their judgment upon others in a vocal and condescending way.
Although I have met a few over the years who are hypocrites in the Biblical sense; they pronounce their Faith and the Glory of God one moment, and the very next moment, they turn around and act in a way that is counter to Christian teaching-counter, for example, to Matthew 6.
Believe me, the "deeply religious" disapprove of them at least as much as the secularists.
If you don't have a Bible and want to read my reference, you can find it at catholic dot org slash bible and then scroll down a bit and search.

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Muslim countries under religious law absolutely believe their beliefs should be enforced by law, and they are. They also push for this whenever they can in other lands. Didn't the newly elected president of Egypt and others solicit the UN for making an international law against blasphemy?
My statement is firmly supported by reality. You assumed I was only talking about America, but assuming instead of clarifying is a mistake. Anyway, Christians in this country absolutely push for legislation that reflects their beliefs but applies to all.

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No, those countries enforce their religion by execution. It is ridiculous to try to connect Christians to that; and conservatives push to defend the 1st amendment while secularists push to obstruct religious freedom.

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Just like Christians used to do, you do understand that, right? Execution was eventually replaced by imprisonment, then shunning, outcasts, stuff like that. Christianity has been forced to grow up morally and ethically, because secular thinking led to slavery being abolished, immigrants getting rights, women being allowed to vote and have equal rights, so forth and so forth. Today Christians want to stop gay marriage and force creation myths to be taught in schools, amongst other acts, where as one time they absolutely would of executed. Sodomy was actually a crime in Texas until the late 70s, their are many counties across the country that prohibit sales of alcohol on Sunday, why should anyone be forced to follow any laws based on biblical beliefs? They shouldnt. Religions have freedoms within their churches, and in publicly owned properties that want them there, that's plenty.

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Regarding religious freedom:
Religious folks are 'entitled' to their freedom just as those who are not religious are 'entitled' to have freedom From religion (or should). Examples: A guy I dated didn't want to see Church pamphlets sitting directly on top of urninals when he went into a public bathroom. Not to mention, such pamphlets in doorways of restaurants, etc. Also, when I had a yardsale, selling a grill, a man came to buy it and asked me before handing me the money, "Do you believe in God?" I was stunned of such a question when all I'm doing is trying to sell my grill. He started rambling about God and religion and so on, then hands me $50 more than what I was selling the grill for. I kept telling him it's not for sale for that much, he refused to let me give back the $50 extra. I didn't answer his question but, what if I had bluntly said, "No"? And was his quesiton and extra funds his way to try to convert me or get me to believe in God if I had told him no?
I have a half-brother I don't know very well but, we've gotten to know each other quite a bit in the past 2 yrs. He works for the third largest Church in the country. He was helpful and nice enough to offer financial help to me to get my vehicle repaired. He's well aware of my belief system. However, when he mailed the funds to me, he also included a religious/Christian book written by the pastor of the Church he works at.
Is all of this appropriate? I don't think so.

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*urinals

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Maybe the others are insulting their beliefs in the process?

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Not usually....

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Alrighty.

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