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HonestSincereLoyalMan HonestSincereLoyalMan 26-30, M 10 Answers Mar 17, 2011

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Some do it because they don't want to make their loved ones sad, too.

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Because they are afraid if getting hurt. So they do not want to seem vulnerable or open to the<br />
possibility of that happening.

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Depression is a disorder that can ruin your life. For many people depression sneaks up on us gradually. We are going about our daily lives and it is only in looking back that we start to realise that our attitude to life has changed. Often it is our family, friends or work colleagues that notice these changes before us.<br />
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* It affects your physical well-being, resulting in chronic fatigue, sleep problems, and changes in appetite.<br />
* It prevents you from enjoying and living your life to the fullest<br />
* You've lost interest in sex or even physical affection<br />
* It affects your mood, with feelings of sadness, emptiness, hopelessness and dysphoria.<br />
* Your place is a mess; laundry and dishes are piled up, mail is unopened, etc.<br />
* We no longer have the same energy and enthusiasm in our relationships.<br />
* You've been making excuses to friends why you can't get together with them, or you're telling them you're "just too tired."<br />
* We often prefer to stay home rather than go out, be alone rather than share and talk. We push others away.<br />
* We become very self focussed and sensitive, easily offended, and quick to snap.<br />
* As our relationships start to break down, we blame ourselves. We feel worthless, believing that no-one would want to be with us because we don't want to be with ourselves. We push people away and then feel worse because we are alone.<br />
* It takes you a whole weekend to do chores that used to only occupy a morning.<br />
* You've really let yourself go - you're wearing clothes that make you look dumpy, you've stopped exercising, you're not shaving unless it's absolutely necessary.<br />
* It affects the way you think, interfering with concentration and decision making.<br />
* You miss out on the sun, the moon, the stars, the sky, the universe, and cats & dogs.<br />
* You're drinking or using drugs to escape the pain.<br />
* it affects your behavior, with increased irritability and loss of temper, social withdrawal, and a reduction in your desire to engage in pleasurable activities.<br />
* You lose things, you lose track of things and can't always remember what day it is.<br />
* You've pretty much stopped eating, or caring what you eat and whether it tastes good.<br />
* On the flip side, you may be eating all the time because you're bored and hope that food will somehow satisfy the vacant feeling you have.<br />
* Sleeping difficulties have started creeping in - either difficulty sleeping, erratic sleeping patterns or difficulty staying awake.<br />
Thanks<br />
<br />
http://www.ecigarette.org/

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It's a defense mechanism. We have reactions of either fight or flight. And we experience this at many different levels. The flight or fight response, also called the "acute stress response" was first described by Walter Cannon in the 1920s. In a nut shell... we experience - we have chemical reactions in the brain - we respond. Those very chemicals out of balance are what cause depression also. It's very interesting. And with awareness of the physical aspect or goings on if you will, then I believe we can better understand and see something through or not act so quickly because we know it's a chemical reaction and we just need to either wait for it to settle down or see a doc for meds to re-balance.

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I think it is because depression mimics sick behavior: eating less, sleeping more, isolating oneself. We are hurting, and we don't want to be around other people because they could be predators who could hurt us more.

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But how about the people we love? Is it we want them to prove something to us? That is what it feels like to me. But even then it doesn't seem to satisfy the need and the emptiness.

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It's a complicated answer. It depends who the down or depressed person is. To attempt to restore the spirits of a stranger or person of no significance to yourself requires selflessness. Lifting the spirits of a significant "other" has immediately known benefits to the person attempting to help.<br />
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I guess it's not that complicated....it boils down to matters of motivation--as it usually does.

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