Certainly not. The mathematics of Chaos Theory states that it is difficult to predict the weather an hour in advance, let alone days or weeks in advance. I used to study meteorology, and now Chaos Theory is my specialty. I can explain it, if you'd like.

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Explain..... = )

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There's two explanations of Chaos Theory. One aspect of it deals with the fact that complex systems often have a simple explanation to its behavior. Another aspect deals with how simple systems can cause complex behavior, and how the tiniest changes in initial changes can cause the most drastic of differences in end behavior, given enough iterations (cycles a function is applied) or time. Perhaps you've heard of the butterfly effect, in which the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil could cause a tornado in Texas. Now while this is a very drastic example, essentially, what Lorenz meant is that a small local disturbance in air molecules disturbs the molecules around them, which in turn disturb even more molecules--and suddenly, the change becomes large-scale, disturbing entire weather systems. Lorenz was a mathematical meteorologist. He was able to explain why we aren't able to accurately predict the weather. Unless we knew every single parameter of every single molecule of air and more or less every single parameter of every single particle in the entire universe, we technically cannot accurately predict the weather with 100% certainty due to the principles of chaos theory. People have did the math and concluded that, even if we had weather stations *everywhere* on earth, we still wouldn't be able to predict the weather more than a few weeks in advance, due to Chaos Theory. The most we can ever hope for in accuracy realistically is a few days, and that's being generous. So... yeah, it's pretty stupid to ever bet anything on the accuracy of meteorologists. In fact, ever since I was 10, I'd be able to better predict the weather than the meteorologists on TV. If a 10 year old that just started understanding meteorology could predict the weather better than a professional in short-term weather, that really says something about the low level of accuracy in weather prediction.

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I just did, while you were posting your comment. Well, I mentioned the Butterfly Effect. I forgot to mention the Black Swan theory.

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No.

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What kind of imbecile would do that?

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