'0' was imported from India.<br />
In Europe, the '0' was long considered as the 'Devil' number by the Church. Until 14th century !

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I did this many moons ago and not absolutely sure of my answer. For a start off, '0' standing alone is not a number; you cannot calculate it with another number to make a calculation. 0 + 100 is 100, so doesn't work as a math. Also, if we put this into date form, then the year before Christ was born would be said to be 1BC, which would mean that (in order) the year Christ was born would be 1 AD. but that wouldn't work. So that means the year Christ was bown would, in effect, be the year 0AD but 0 is not a number in this case. 1 year BC is the year before AD1; there is no place for a year '0' or a year 'zero' because it isn't a number.<br />
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It all culminates in, for instance, the year 1601 being the 17th Century, even though anyone living in 1601 would be living *within* the the centuray number of 16.<br />
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OK, it's comlicated, but the only time a '0' can be a number is when it's a second digit ... and I now have headache ... HA!<br />
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~F~

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Well, they've might of used the term none instead? xD

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They all had money; no-one was broke so they had no need for zero :)

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Zero was first used (as a placeholder meaning "nothing" in account books) by the Babylonians in about 700BC, but it wasn't invented in its current form until about the 9th century (in India), well after the Romans.<br />
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Mind you, I'm surprised the Romans didn't see the need for a placeholder...

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thanks for the interesting fact, I didn't know that...cool :)

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Yes, I did know the history of how it came about but have forgotten now. Honest haha.

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I think I was told so at school, a major invention transmitted by Indian intellectuals.

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They gave us nothing! lol

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They did, through the Arabs.

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nope

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the number zero didn't come until the end of the crusades

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