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MightyWhitey MightyWhitey 22-25, M 13 Answers Jul 25, 2013 in Community

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I saw some early studies addressing this topic. Unfortunately at the time I think a lot of people we're a little confused and thought that they were indicating that older people become dramatically less intelligent. This is not the case and more modern presentations of data have shown a much more gradual decline that results in even the very aged keeping a good deal of their mental prowess, barring unfortunate illness.



This is more realistic, although there is a case to be made that the intelligence does not actually disappear at all, but becomes masked.



Take the Fight or Flight Instinct for instance. When faced with a threat or uncertainty, people sometimes exhibit the F/F stress reaction. This is because choosing one or the other assures a certain chance of survival, even if neither is actually the best choice. Your brain and body pick the safe bets rather than risk taking valuable time to consider other options.



A similar thing may be in play even today. When a young subject and an old subject are presented with a problem, they both begin their problem solving processes. The younger participant's perception of the problem is different from the elder's. They have fewer, or no previous examples and must resort to out-of-the-box, innovated, novel, or abstract ideas more quickly than the elder. The elder has a greater chance of having seen similar problems before, and because our brains love using cognitive shorthand, begins going down their checklist of possible strategies. Considering strategies A through Z, where Z is to innovate, it is more likely that the elder will hit upon an old strategy that seems to work, and will stop proceeding down the list, even if a different option is actually a better choice. This would mean that the resulting differences are actually due to differing systems of evaluation that occur naturally as we age. It doesn't necessarily indicate that the elder is actually less capable of abstract reasoning, but instead that they don't feel the need to resort to it and rely more on their repertoire of previously tested concepts.



This could very well be hardwired into our cognitive processes, and may explain other phenomena as well, such as why people's attitudes about various topics change as they age.

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In a sense I would agree with this statement. As for myself, I doubt my own thinking a great deal. This is why I need a partner with similar thoughts as mine. He's usually much more clear headed than I am. And tells me I need to simply let certain things be.

I don't profess to be intelligent. I know I'm not. However I do tend to place my emotions on a higher level than my common sense.

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Honest. I can respect that.

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on the otrairy, it gets better

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No, it increases.

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I'll let you know in a few months.

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i thought your brain wasn't fully formed until 25

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If anything mine has gotten stronger, I'm almost 50 and I still destroy those portions of any IQ test.

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What do YOU know, you young Smart A$$. lol

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:) Just gathering information for my brain.

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Gather it while you Can,looks like your Knocking at the 25 Door. lol

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:) I've actually knocked past the 25 door. lol

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heck, many people aren't even capable of that before age 25 - if you keep your mind sharp, it should be fine well into your 40s

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