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Lebanese American or Welsh American etc etc etc......I thought the whole point was to become an American period, not half an American. What has made America a pretty great country is the fact that we are a melting pot - a hodge podge of different cultures, tastes and personalities. I'm a mutt myself, but I don't go around saying I'm half an American. What gives? *Enter firestorm in 3......2......1.....*
idlewatcher idlewatcher 31-35, M 21 Answers Aug 25, 2011

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I like to think people can label themselves however they want and if they want to be a part of a specific group then so be it. I describe myself as Native American.

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Sure thing, I'm not saying it's bad to do so, I'm just curious as to the motivation is all. My point being is that you don't call yourself "Thai-Native American" or "African-Native American" .

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No, but my primary characteristics are Native American and my spiritual belief lean that way as well. I think it is about identifying particular sub-cultures within the country, not about alienating anyone though it might have those effects.

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I see your point, however, the masses don't recognize your personal beliefs as an origin, it's what's on your passport ;) Speaking of passports, which type do Native Americans have? My business associate is friends with the Cherokee Chief which I think is super cool!

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It's divisive.

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extremely so

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I really don't see the point. Most of us either came here ourselves, or grew up with family who came here, to avoid the chaos and hatred in the world for the opportunity that this nation offers

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I find it kind of silly and annoying...but I'm not surprised since many people are determined to bring their countries with them when they come here. And many refuse to assimilate... but really, I don't get too uptight about it. Seems like the idea of what to call people changes every few years. If just becomes a bit of a pain to know what to refer to people as in order to avoid offending. I can't keep up with it all. And yes, I think the idea is to be an American when you come to live in the States. If someone asks where you came from, then you can give your country of origin, but I think adding that, even if you hold dual citizenship, is kind of unnecessary.

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I couldn't agree more. People that move to the US take an oath (and get a passport) stating they are an American, not Mexican-American, not Canadian-American etc. I'm very proud to be an American and as you said, it's proper in conversation to ask country of origin - if so inclined. There will never be any hegemony in the US if people won't accept that we are all one....and that is American.

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I can see if you only have one heritage outside of being american like many Italian american's have only been here for one or two generations so they pay some respect to their heritage but for people like me that have so many different things in my background, I think of myself as the definition of American. I am all kinds of things mixed into one and I like it that way.

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Well stated, thanks for the insight.

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i dunno... for me it harkens back to a person's history. i'm interested in my own history and i take an interest in knowing where other people came from originally. each hyphenation adds a la<x>yer of depth and texture. sure, America is a great melting pot. but what makes us interesting is that we aren't all the same flavor. :0] i also find that there is a HUGE difference in the way the east coast of America perceives cultural heritage and the way that the west coast of America does it. i can see how, in some places, it could be used as a means of exclusiveness or devision. the thing is, those who would allow it to divide them would find ANY NUMBER of reasons to do so. so really, what's in a name?

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I agree - everyone has a history to tell and despite what people think, I really don't care if you call yourself Alien-American or Canadian-French etc etc etc. You are who you are at the end of the day. :)

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Who cares? Not me.....Most of us "Americans" can't see past our own noses. White, black poka-dotted...whatever.

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We do have a tendency to live in a vacuum, I would have to agree.

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I think you will find that those from other countries often parade around as if they have hidden understanding of other cultures, but they don't. Not only are they practically as ignorant of others as you think Americans are, they are actually less open than we are.

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Yes,that is true ( I'm from Australia,BTW.)

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I think it's stupid your american or your not.

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I describe myself as an American, even though my father is full blooded native indian and my mother is of scottish decent. The only thing pure about me is the country I was born in, not my blood since I am a mixed!

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Thanks for the response Nahla. That is how I am. I also have mixed blood aka mutt, but I identify myself as an American b/c this is the country that I love, that I was born in, that I'm comfortable in and that I work in.

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The way I look at it, if you came from another country and become a citizen of the U.S.A. then it's okay to call yourself African American or whatever nationality you are.<br />
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If you were born in the U.S.A., regardless of which country your parents are a citizen of, then you are an American, period, end of story! I was born in the U.S.A. so I am an American. My race/color doesn't matter here. God bless America! :)<br />
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However, I think that some people use those terms to indicate race without regard to a person's country of birth. That's improper use of the term in my opinion.

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Thank you for being objective

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I am just horny.......and Amerkin

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*hands MYEPHAUNTS a cold Busch light*

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Maybe you can get that as a new category on the census: horny American

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hehehehe-thank ya

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I tried-my vote did not count : (

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I could care less what people call themselves.

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lol

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I don't really care what people want to call themselves, who am I to say what someone should call themselves? The thing is, there was a documentary on T.V. a while back, and they took ten people <br />
from totally different nationalities and races. and traced their DNA ancestors all the way back to <br />
Africa. So, pretty proof guys, now whatever you wanna call is fine, but do your research also.

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We all come from africa if you want to trace the origin of our awesome species. I consider myself an Earthling, man.

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I thought we all came from dust?

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An immigrant to anywhere should work very hard to assimilate into his new country. However, you can't expect a person to stop being what he is just because he comes to, say, the United States. <br />
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Our country has been populated by people who can't or won't forget from the start, beginning with the Scots and Scots-Irish. Many of us, their decendants, are still irritable and irritating. Besides being temperamental, we play the bagpipes in your police bands. We have highland games. We drink and cuss. Some of us are still hillbillies. But still seriously American. <br />
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--As those with roots to other places are. My life would not be what it is today without my old Palestinian neighborhood restaurant, the Sicilian's in my mother's hometown, the Orthodox Jewish neighborhood I grew up in, these crazy Swedes and Germans who make up the population of my current state, etc. Whatever friction there is anymore, I can deal with it.

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Very cool post, I appreciate it.

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I don't think it matters. I like calling myself an African American.

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I like to call myself sexy-American. I figure if I say it enough then I am one. <br />
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;)

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Amen to that!

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I prefer mutt

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brobro, you have the best mullet I've ever seen.

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