New York State Of Mind - And How Our Nyc Area Culture Is Different From The Other 49.5 States.


Lyrics
with NY attitude of course.

I don't like cities, but I like New York
Other places make me feel like a dork
Los Angeles is for people who sleep
Paris and London, baby you can keep

Baby you can keep
(repeat 7 times)

Other cities always make me mad
Other places always make me sad
No other city ever made me glad
Except New York
I love New York
I love New York
I love New York

If you don't like my attitude, then you can 'Fvck' off
Just go to Texas, and svck George Bush's d*ck off
New York is not for little ******* who scream
If you can't stand the heat then get off my street
Get off my street

Get off my street 
You get off my street
(repeat 3 times)

Other cities always make me mad
Other places always make me sad
No other city ever made me glad
Except New York
I love New York
I love New York
I love New York

I love New York [Get off my street, get off my street]
(repeat 3 times)

Get off my street
You get off my street
(repeat 3 times)

And More.

A friend sent me this article, which tells the story of every native New Yorker:
(From the site We World Escape)

One of the most unique aspects of New York, more striking than even the most spectacular monument or the grandest skyscraper, is the attitude of the people who live there. When you first experience it, the New York attitude can seem rude but, if you take the time to understand why they adopt this tough external shell, you will come to see that it is not rudeness ... or, at least, not exactly.

New York is a tough place to live. Few places on Earth are as competitive at every level of society - simply getting from one end of a street to the other can be a challenge in this busy, overcrowded metropolis. New Yorkers live at a frantic pace because, for them, every second genuinely does count. For most people, their rent wipes out a frighteningly large portion of their monthly earnings, forcing them into a continual game of catch-up and, buddy, you'd better not get in their way.

You will come across the brusque New York attitude in practically every situation in which people interact with other people. New Yorkers themselves, when you query them on it, tend to see the typical attitude of their city as being a mixture of toughness, bravery and plain-talking, all mixed in with a dash of being overworked. They will reluctant admit that they can see how visitors might, just possibly, perceive this as rudeness but they find it hard to believe that anyone would prefer the sunny West Coast attitude, which they perceive as being horribly fake and insincere.

In one sense, there is a wonderful egalitarianism to New York rudeness: it's not just some rough n' tough hoodlums throwing their weight around, it's everyone, no matter how lowly their status or how diminutive their stature. If someone decides to live in New York, no matter how meek they may have been before arriving, they quickly learn that the best defense is a good offense.

The hustle and bustle caused by people from every nation being thrown together in one city creates a background buzz of cultural misunderstanding. You are never sure if the person sitting next to you on the subway can even speak your language. In an insane city, the only sane response is to protect yourself and make it clear that you will not allow anyone to mess with you. Different cultures deploy different subtleties in how they deal with one another but when you have every culture in the world thrown together in the massive melting pot that is New York, all your subtleties simply aren't going to noticed, you've got to escalate your self-expression to a level at which there is no room for misunderstanding. So, if you come from a traditionally reserved country such as England or Japan, you can check your polite reserve in at the airport when you arrive, you won't be needing it in New York.

Behind that aggressive New York attitude, however, there is a genuine bond between New Yorkers. In a sense, there always had been such a bond, insofar as New Yorkers have always felt united in the face of the antipathy that much of the rest of America has historically felt towards them, but it was the terror attacks of 9/11 that shocked the city to it's core and created a new mood, throughout America but most deeply in New York. In the horrific aftermath, New Yorkers found a new sense of unity and there was a general feeling that, in the face of such massive loss and such selfless sacrifice, individual New Yorkers could no longer be as focused only upon their own selfish needs. New Yorkers have always been hard working people and it is not unusual for people to work two or more jobs, just to keep their heads above water. Many had become completely immersed in their own problems and didn't have much time left to worry about anyones else's. In one of the most densely populated cities in the history of mankind, many New Yorkers had become isolated, emotionally stranded by the pressures of trying to make it in a workaholic culture.

That terrible day in September, 2001, was a collective wake-up call for New Yorkers and, in it's wake, many took the opportunity to stand back and re-assess their lives, to alter their course. Many visitors have observed that New York today is a noticeably more thoughtful and self-aware city than it was in the Eighties and Nineties.

That is not to say, however, that all is now sweetness and light in the Big Apple, you still need to make sure that you don't end up and the wrong side of the sharp tongue of a New Yorker. So, to help you avoid any unpleasant incidents marring your trip to New York, have a quick look at the list of tips we have assembled to help you to Go with the New York Flow


SpiceZ SpiceZ
56-60, F
Sep 16, 2012