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I Am A Teacher - Why I Went On Strike

Someone deleted and answer, maybe their question, about why teachers shouldn't have gone on strike yesterday. They too are from the UK, and forget to mention, or moan at the fact that most public sector workers also went on strike. They had issues with the fact that they worked hard and we, as teachers, don't.
So here's a run down of a typical day for me.

Class Age: 8-9.
Class size: 32
SEN: 6
EAL: 2
TA: 2 - one for whole class, one for 11 hours a week one on one time with ASD/ADHD (no medication) child.
Start time: 7.15-7.30 (Children come in at 8.40)
End time: 5-6pm (Children are gone by 3.45)
Break: 15 mins per day
Lunch: 1 hour per day
PPA (Prep/Plan/Out of class time): 2.5 hours weekly

I worked it out one day, exactly how many hours I do a week. It came to around the 60 mark. That included some of the time, like now, where I work at home, planning, assessments etc.. Stuff I can't do during the day.

With the new plans, I am on a two year pay freeze, so my extra 500-1k a year is now non-existent, I lose £700 a month on taxes, pension and national insurance a month. My mum, who has been teaching longer, therefore on bigger monies, loses £1.5k a month. She loses my wages in tax and pension.

In order to receive my full pension, I have to work until I am 75.
If I have children, I lose maternity money if I take off more than 6 months, that means my pension also loses out.
If I get sick and lose sick pay money, my pension also loses out.

I can't afford to move out. Rent is £700-800 a month for room. That's not including bills etc..
I need a deposit of £50-70k before I can even think about getting a mortgage.

If I can't afford my own house, I'd like to at least think I can relax a little when Im old.

So don't tell me I don't work hard, or your neighbours don't work hard. If they can afford to send their children to university and live in a four bed house, then good for them. It's for people like me, who started teaching within the last few years who will suffer the most.
MrsLalaninjacakes MrsLalaninjacakes 26-30, F 21 Responses Dec 1, 2011

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I live in the UK. I'm not a public sector worker but I support you in your fight etc, stirkes and all. In this country we should be trying to get the low payed private sector works to have a pension as good as the pubic sector. Not dropping your pension to the level of thiers. <br />
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Best of luck Dave.

Everyone has that same problem, except the Government Officials. It is us, the ones who suffer, who must pay them Millions of Dollars per year, to do do this to us. How sad, we allow this to happen.

Well said hun!

It's time they listened.

It's disgusting and it's happening worldwide. The proletariat forced to pay for bankers profligacy and greed.<br />
It's time we all woke up and told em to *** off.

what about the holidays?

I do sympathize, would you be allowed to opt out of the ' teachers pension' and arrange your own?<br />
<br />
Just wondered if that may be an option . .

Hugs to you too!

I think everyone should spend one day shadowing us, just to see

Lala, people have no idea. My daughter is a teacher as well. Her first year teaching....Add to her class time evenings at home preparing her lessons, extra time for proctoring events after school, telephone conferences with parents, you name it, teachers do it.. She is a resource teacher, so each lesson needs to be adapted to each of her student's Individual needs. that's a lot of work right there. The new hires have to contribute 25% more to their health benefits this year and every year from now on, They've started the newbies at the same salary for over ten years...they tend to keep the new hires on at the school for two years then let them go so they don't have to pay them a greater salary...her loan load is heavy too...People have no idea. But they should because, like you, like me and like my daughter.... we are all the 99 %!

yep :(

lala, regarding your earlier point, the government are wilfully ignorant of what goes on in the classroom and the onus placed on teaching staff, and that goes for most people too, sadly :(

They do shift work, the most of them anyway, they know what they're in for

Hi MrsLalaninjacakes<br />
Good post. Thanks.<br />
good luck<br />
:)

Dedre: I do love my job. I got paid much more being a graphic designer, and I wouldn't give up what I do now for the job I had then.<br />
<br />
wolf: I'll kick them very hard

teachers are underrated i say. i had one teacher who had been around since the 50's. every student in the class was an annoying brat yet he kept trying. he retired the year after but the fact that he worked that long sure says something. next time someone says you need to work harder.... kick them in their peaches.

I realized long ago, when I had friends who I would help ('tutor' is too professional a word for someone like me to use in such informal memories as these), they would say that I explain things well and such, and should look about it...I had always had the conviction that no matter what I could realistically make, teaching is about loving to teach, and those who follow that path sadly never get the recognition nor pay deserved by it.

: )<br />
<br />
I'd like our education minister to actually spend one day in a school to see exactly what goes on.

Teachers kick @ss! and they work their @sses off too, prolly why I could neva be one... that and my apparent grammar problemo lolz but I give much props to teachers all over. so kudos to you miss lala :)

Haha, dude I can't do that.<br />
<br />
My class are awesome, but when people tell me I don't work hard enough to earn my pension and I earn too much for what I do..... makes me want to teach them a lesson or two

thats just not fair. you deserve more than that lala. i have heard how hard your class is and know how good a teacher you are so i think you should get the entire country to go on strike.