Almost Seven Months Have Passed

They say that time heals all wounds, I feel like i'm bleeding out by the end of each month. I cry 3-4 times daily and have such pain in me. I miss his love and devotion for me. I miss the glances and casual touches throughout the day that say, I love you. I miss the heat and passion. Alan died Christmas Day; it's not fair; we had so many plans, hopes and dreams left to pursue. He was only 58 years old..why GOD! Our 17th anniversary is August 1st; I am going North with his ashes to have a memorial service with his friends and family on August 6th. How am I going to get through this? I pray daily for strength, but at times have so much pain I can't stand to be with myself. How do you survive losing the love of your life, now that the shock and numbness have worn off?
Izzymari
Izzymari Izzymari
56-60
5 Responses Jul 20, 2010

I feel your pain. I am married but my new husband is not nearly the same as the first and soul mate of my very first love whom passed away tragically . I didn't even get to tell him good bye are kiss him are see him at the time of his death. I was in a car accident with him he died I survived still to this day his memories , haunt me . I fell guilty thinking of him while I am married again . But the way he was he was very loving threw out the day he would say I love you and I Love you more , he would hold me , and sit with me on th couch many times. Times like this I miss about him cause my husband now really dose not spend that much time with me romanticly and it makes me miss him even more sorry if it sounds as though I am rambling about it . Sometime I wonder why I had to live on why we couldn't just die together . Life can be crule sometime and none seems to understand people and there soul mates but I do and I lost my angel Paul Mullen my Soul mate forever more R.I.P. I never even got to kiss you good bye are hold your hand are tell you how much I Love you the day you passed away . Even though I am married the memory of you will always remain scars of the past will always be with me. I have scars from the accident and living in pain from my accident. But , I try to remain strong in hopes one day we shall be united if you need someone to talk to please email me at <br />
tammiegroat@gmail.com<br />
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I will gladly listen if you need to talk about your soul mates that you have lost .

I feel your pain. I am married but my new husband is not nearly the same as the first and soul mate of my very first love whom passed away tragically . I didn't even get to tell him good bye are kiss him are see him at the time of his death. I was in a car accident with him he died I survived still to this day his memories , haunt me . I fell guilty thinking of him while I am married again . But the way he was he was very loving threw out the day he would say I love you and I Love you more , he would hold me , and sit with me on th couch many times. Times like this I miss about him cause my husband now really dose not spend that much time with me romanticly and it makes me miss him even more sorry if it sounds as though I am rambling about it . Sometime I wonder why I had to live on why we couldn't just die together . Life can be crule sometime and none seems to understand people and there soul mates but I do and I lost my angel Paul Mullen my Soul mate forever more R.I.P. I never even got to kiss you good bye are hold your hand are tell you how much I Love you the day you passed away . Even though I am married the memory of you will always remain scars of the past will always be with me. I have scars from the accident and living in pain from my accident. But , I try to remain strong in hopes one day we shall be united if you need someone to talk to please email me at <br />
tammiegroat@gmail.com<br />
<br />
I will gladly listen if you need to talk about your soul mates that you have lost .

The last one:<br />
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A Sure Hope for the Dead<br />
A 25-year-old woman wrote: “In 1981 my adoptive mother died of cancer. Her death was very hard on me and my adoptive brother. I was 17, and my brother was 11. I missed her so much. Having been taught that she was in heaven, well, I wanted to take my own life to be with her. She was my best friend.”<br />
It seems so unfair that death should have the power to take away someone you love. And when it happens, the thought of never again being able to talk to, laugh with, or hold your loved one can be most difficult to bear. That pain is not necessarily erased by being told that your loved one is up in heaven.<br />
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The Bible, however, holds out a much different hope. As we have previously noted, the Scriptures indicate that it is possible to be reunited with your dead loved one in the near future, not in an unknown heaven but right here on earth under peaceful, righteous conditions. And at that time humans will have the prospect of enjoying perfect health, and they will never have to die again. ‘But surely that is wishful thinking!’ some may say.<br />
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What would it take to convince you that this is a sure hope? To believe in a promise, you would need to be certain that the one making the promise is both willing and able to fulfill it. Who, then, is it that promises that the dead will live again?<br />
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In the spring of 31 C.E., Jesus Christ boldly promised: “Just as the Father raises the dead up and makes them alive, so the Son also makes those alive whom he wants to. Do not marvel at this, because the hour is coming in which all those in the memorial tombs will hear his [Jesus’] voice and come out.” (John 5:21, 28, 29) Yes, Jesus Christ promised that millions now dead will live again on this earth and have the prospect of remaining on it forever under peaceful, paradisaic conditions. (Luke 23:43; John 3:16; 17:3; compare Psalm 37:29 and Matthew 5:5.) Since Jesus made the promise, it is safe to assume that he is willing to fulfill it. But is he able to do so?<br />
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Less than two years after making that promise, Jesus demonstrated in a powerful way that he is both willing and able to perform the resurrection.<br />
“Lazarus, Come On Out!”<br />
It was a touching scene. Lazarus was gravely ill. His two sisters, Mary and Martha, sent word to Jesus, who was across the Jordan River: “Lord, see! the one for whom you have affection is sick.” (John 11:3) They knew that Jesus loved Lazarus. Would not Jesus want to see his sick friend? Curiously, instead of going to Bethany immediately, Jesus stayed where he was for the next two days.—John 11:5, 6.<br />
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Lazarus died some time after the message about his sickness was sent. Jesus knew when Lazarus died, and he intended to do something about it. By the time Jesus finally arrived in Bethany, his dear friend had been dead four days. (John 11:17, 39) Could Jesus bring back to life someone who had been dead that long?<br />
On hearing that Jesus was coming, Martha, a woman of action, ran out to meet him. (Compare Luke 10:38-42.) Touched by her sorrow, Jesus assured her: “Your brother will rise.” When she indicated her faith in a future resurrection, Jesus plainly told her: “I am the resurrection and the life. He that exercises faith in me, even though he dies, will come to life.”—John 11:20-25.<br />
Upon arriving at the tomb, Jesus directed that the stone closing its entrance be taken away. Then, after praying aloud, he commanded: “Lazarus, come on out!”—John 11:38-43.<br />
All eyes were fixed on the tomb. Then, out of the darkness, a figure emerged. His feet and hands were bound with wrappings, and his face was bound with a cloth. “Loose him and let him go,” ordered Jesus. The last of the unraveled bandages fell to the ground. Yes, it was Lazarus, the man who had been dead four days!—John 11:44.<br />
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Did It Really Happen?<br />
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The account of the raising of Lazarus is presented in the Gospel of John as a historical fact. The details are too vivid for it to be a mere allegory. To question its historicity is to question all the miracles of the Bible, including the resurrection of Jesus Christ himself. And to deny the resurrection of Jesus is to deny the Christian faith as a whole.—1 Corinthians 15:13-15.<br />
Actually, if you accept the existence of God, you should have no problem believing in the resurrection. To illustrate: A person can videotape his last will and testament, and after he dies, his relatives and friends can see and hear him, in effect, as he explains how his estate is to be handled. A hundred years ago, such a thing was unthinkable. And to some people now living in remote parts of the world, the technology of video recording is so beyond comprehension as to seem miraculous. If scientific principles established by the Creator can be used by humans to reconstruct such a visible and audible scene, should not the Creator be able to do far more? Is it not reasonable, then, that the One who created life is capable of re-creating it?<br />
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The miracle of Lazarus’ restoration to life served to increase faith in Jesus and the resurrection. (John 11:41, 42; 12:9-11, 17-19) In a touching way, it also reveals the willingness and desire of Jehovah and his Son to perform the resurrection.<br />
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‘God Will Have a Yearning’<br />
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The response of Jesus to Lazarus’ death reveals a very tender side of the Son of God. His deep feelings on this occasion clearly indicate his intense desire to resurrect the dead. We read: “Mary, when she arrived where Jesus was and caught sight of him, fell at his feet, saying to him: ‘Lord, if you had been here, my brother would not have died.’ Jesus, therefore, when he saw her weeping and the Jews that came with her weeping, groaned in the spirit and became troubled; and he said: ‘Where have you laid him?’ They said to him: ‘Lord, come and see.’ Jesus gave way to tears. Therefore the Jews began to say: ‘See, what affection he used to have for him!’”—John 11:32-36.<br />
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Jesus’ heartfelt compassion is here indicated by three ex<x>pressions: “groaned,” “became troubled,” and “gave way to tears.” The original-language words used in recording this touching scene indicate that Jesus was so deeply moved by the death of his dear friend Lazarus and the sight of Lazarus’ sister weeping that His eyes brimmed over with tears.<br />
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What is so remarkable is that Jesus had previously brought two others back to life. And he fully intended to do the same with Lazarus. (John 11:11, 23, 25) Yet, he “gave way to tears.” Restoring humans to life, then, is not a mere procedure for Jesus. His tender and deep feelings as manifested on this occasion clearly indicate his intense desire to undo the ravages of death.<br />
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Since Jesus is ‘the exact representation of Jehovah God’s very being,’ we rightly expect no less of our heavenly Father. (Hebrews 1:3) Of Jehovah’s own willingness to perform the resurrection, the faithful man Job said: “If an able-bodied man dies can he live again? . . . You will call, and I myself shall answer you. For the work of your hands you will have a yearning.” (Job 14:14, 15) Here the original-language word that is rendered “you will have a yearning” denotes God’s earnest longing and desire. (Genesis 31:30; Psalm 84:2) Clearly, Jehovah must keenly anticipate the resurrection.<br />
Can we really believe the resurrection promise? Yes, there is no doubt that Jehovah and his Son are both willing and able to fulfill it. What does this mean for you? You have the prospect of being reunited with dead loved ones right here on earth but under very different conditions!<br />
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Jehovah God, who started mankind off in a lovely garden, has promised to restore Paradise on this earth under the rule of His heavenly Kingdom in the hands of the now glorified Jesus Christ. (Genesis 2:7-9; Matthew 6:10; Luke 23:42, 43) In that restored Paradise, the human family will have the prospect of enjoying life without end, free from all sickness and disease. (Revelation 21:1-4; compare Job 33:25; Isaiah 35:5-7.) Gone, too, will be all hatred, racial prejudice, ethnic violence, and economic oppression. It will be into such a cleansed earth that Jehovah God through Jesus Christ will resurrect the dead.<br />
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That is now the hope of the Christian woman mentioned at the beginning of this section. Several years after her mother died, Jehovah’s Witnesses helped her to make a careful study of the Bible. She recalls: “After learning about the resurrection hope, I cried. It was wonderful to know that I will see my mother again.”<br />
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If your heart similarly yearns to see a loved one again, Jehovah’s Witnesses will gladly assist you to learn how you can make this sure hope your very own. Why not contact them at a Kingdom Hall near you..<br />
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I hope this helps...it's the truth!

There Is a Real Hope<br />
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The Bible writer Paul offered hope of relief from that “last enemy,” death. He wrote: “Death is to be brought to nothing.” “The last enemy to be abolished is death.” (1 Corinthians 15:26, The New English Bible) Why could Paul be so sure of that? Because he had been taught by one who had been raised from the dead, Jesus Christ. (Acts 9:3-19) That is also why Paul could write: “Since death is through a man [Adam], resurrection of the dead is also through a man [Jesus Christ]. For just as in Adam all are dying, so also in the Christ all will be made alive.”—1 Corinthians 15:21, 22.<br />
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Jesus was deeply grieved when he met a widow of Nain and saw her dead son. The Bible account tells us: “As [Jesus] got near the gate of the city [Nain], why, look! there was a dead man being carried out, the only-begotten son of his mother. Besides, she was a widow. A considerable crowd from the city was also with her. And when the Lord caught sight of her, he was moved with pity for her, and he said to her: ‘Stop weeping.’ With that he approached and touched the bier, and the bearers stood still, and he said: ‘Young man, I say to you, Get up!’ And the dead man sat up and started to speak, and he gave him to his mother. Now fear seized them all, and they began to glorify God, saying: ‘A great prophet has been raised up among us,’ and, ‘God has turned his attention to his people.’” Notice how Jesus was moved with pity, so that he resurrected the widow’s son! Imagine what that portends for the future!—Luke 7:12-16.<br />
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There, in front of eyewitnesses, Jesus performed an unforgettable resurrection. It was a token of the resurrection that he had already predicted some time prior to this event, a restoration to life on earth under “a new heaven.” On that occasion Jesus had said: “Do not marvel at this, because the hour is coming in which all those in the memorial tombs will hear his voice and come out.”—Revelation 21:1, 3, 4; John 5:28, 29; 2 Peter 3:13.<br />
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Other eyewitnesses to a resurrection included Peter, along with some others of the 12 who accompanied Jesus on his travels. They actually heard the resurrected Jesus speak by the Sea of Galilee. The account tells us: “Jesus said to them: ‘Come, take your breakfast.’ Not one of the disciples had the courage to inquire of him: ‘Who are you?’ because they knew it was the Lord. Jesus came and took the bread and gave it to them, and the fish likewise. This was now the third time that Jesus appeared to the disciples after his being raised up from the dead.”—John 21:12-14.<br />
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Therefore, Peter could write with utter conviction: “Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, for according to his great mercy he gave us a new birth to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead.”—1 Peter 1:3.<br />
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The apostle Paul expressed his confident hope when he said: “I believe all the things set forth in the Law and written in the Prophets; and I have hope toward God, which hope these men themselves also entertain, that there is going to be a resurrection of both the righteous and the unrighteous.”—Acts 24:14, 15.<br />
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Millions therefore can have the solid hope of seeing their loved ones alive again on earth but under very different circumstances. What will those circumstances be? Further details of the Bible-based hope for our lost loved ones will be discussed in the final section of this brochure, entitled “A Sure Hope for the Dead.”<br />
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But first let us consider questions you may have if you are grieving over the loss of a loved one: Is it normal to grieve this way? How can I live with my grief? What can others do to help me cope? How can I help others who are grieving? And principally, What does the Bible say about a sure hope for the dead? Will I ever see my loved ones again? And where?

Hello my friend,<br />
<br />
I want to share something with you that helped me tremendously! <br />
It is a lot of reading, however it will help you. If you have any question, please let me know.<br />
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Take care,<br />
<br />
Wayne<br />
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“It Can’t Be True!”<br />
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A NEW YORK (U.S.A.) man relates: “My son Jonathan was visiting friends a few miles away. My wife, Valentina, didn’t like him to go out there. She was always nervous about the traffic. But he loved electronics, and his friends had a workshop where he could get practical experience. I was at home in west Manhattan, New York. My wife was away visiting her family in Puerto Rico. ‘Jonathan will be back soon,’ I thought. Then the doorbell rang. ‘That’ll be him for sure.’ It wasn’t. It was the police and paramedics. ‘Do you recognize this driver’s license?’ the police officer asked. ‘Yes, that’s my son’s, Jonathan’s.’ ‘We’ve got bad news for you. There’s been an accident, and . . . your son, . . . your son has been killed.’ My first reaction was, ‘It can’t be true!’ That bombshell opened a wound in our hearts that is still healing, even years later.”<br />
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A father in Barcelona (Spain) writes: “Back in the Spain of the 1960’s, we were a happy family. There were María, my wife, and our three children, David, Paquito, and Isabel, aged 13, 11, and 9 respectively.<br />
“One day in March 1963, Paquito came home from school complaining of severe head pains. We were baffled as to what could be the cause—but not for long. Three hours later he was dead. A cerebral hemorrhage had snuffed out his life.<br />
“Paquito’s death took place over 30 years ago. Even so, the deep pain of that loss stays with us to this day. There is no way that parents can lose a child and not feel that they have lost something of themselves—regardless of how much time passes or how many other children they may have.”<br />
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These two experiences, where parents lost children, illustrate how deep and lasting the wound is when a child dies. How true the words of a doctor who wrote: “The death of a child is usually more tragic and traumatic than the death of an older person because a child is the last person in the family expected to die. . . . The death of any child represents the loss of future dreams, relationships [son, daughter-in-law, grandchildren], experiences . . . that have not yet been enjoyed.” And this sense of deep loss can also apply to any woman who has lost a baby through miscarriage.<br />
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A bereaved wife explains: “My husband, Russell, had served as a medical aide in the Pacific theater during World War II. He had seen and survived some terrible battles. He came back to the United States and to a more tranquil life. Later he served as a minister of God’s Word. In his early 60’s he began to have symptoms of a heart problem. He tried to lead an active life. Then, one day in July 1988, he suffered a massive heart attack and died. His loss was devastating. I never even got to say good-bye. He was not just my husband. He was my best friend. We had shared 40 years of life together. Now it seemed that I had to face a special loneliness.”<br />
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These are just a few of the thousands of tragedies that strike families throughout the world every day. As most grieving persons will tell you, when death takes your child, your husband, your wife, your parent, your friend, it is truly what the Christian writer Paul called it, “the last enemy.” Often the first natural reaction to the dreadful news may be denial, “It can’t be true! I don’t believe it.” Other reactions often follow, as we will see.—1 Corinthians 15:25, 26.<br />
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However, before we consider the feelings of grief, let us answer some important questions. Does death mean the end of that person? Is there any hope that we can see our loved ones again?