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Zen Buddhist

Although my current affiliation is Pagan, my history is primarily Zen Buddhist.

I was confirmed as a Buddhist at age 17 by Rev. Ronald N. Thayer, Roshi.  Rev. Thayer founded the MaTaVa ecumenical sect of Buddhism and built a temple in Saginaw, Michigan.  It was known for having the largest Buddha-rupa in the United States.  I studied with Rev. Thayer for a number of years, and had permission to teach at age 19.

I taught a beginning Zen meditation course at Oberlin College for actual college credit. I studied for six months in 1976 at the San Francisco Zen Center, founded by Suzuki Roshi.  I studied there under Richard Baker Roshi.  Edward Espe Brown was an acquaintnce of mine.

At the SFZC I attended a lecture by Maezumi Roshi of Japan where I received transmission and lit incense with him.

I have attended several workshops led by Philip Kapleau Roshi, and a seven day sesshin at the Minneapolis Zen Center.

I have studied under Les Kaye of the Mountain View, California Zen community. 

I was a member of the Skyline Buddhist Retreat communal living center under Kobun Chino Sensei.  That community is now the Jukoji Retreat Center of Los Gatos California.

I have also attended several workshops and meditation groups in the Tantric Tradition.

I Love Buddhism.  It remains close to my heart, and I would be more than happy to answer any questions that might arise.

IceStoneTrue IceStoneTrue 54, F 8 Responses Nov 13, 2009

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And, what is your name?

I was raised by my Japanese grandmother. She was a Soto Zen Buddhist and I attended a Buddhist school grades 1-11.



You can call it a religion or philosophy or whatever you want. I call it a way of life. Nobody that has not lived a Zen life from childhood will ever understand what it means to walk the true path. I sit in meditation at least 2 hours every day.



When you can do nothing, what can you do?

Isn't Buddhism more of a philosophy than a religion? What's the difference between Taoism and Buddhism?

Again, my expertise is Zen, which strictly speaking isn't a religion, so there's no conflict with any of them.



I was the only Buddhist I knew who also believed in God. And I had a Jewish friend in college who also studied Zen and Kundalini Yoga. He was a hefty, strong-like-bull vegetarian we used as an example to people that vegetarian didn't mean scrawny.

SMILES CAN BE DANGEROUS



YOUR EASTERN PRETENSE



ONE PERSON TOLD ME NAMASTE MEANT "i WISH EVERY EVIL UPON YOU" AS AN EXPERT USER, ENLIGHTEN ME

*smiles*



Western minds!



Namaste

Yes, I know. But without credentials some won't even bother to ask. It reaches more people, final answer.

Why all the name dropping?