Serious question(s) for black American Christians. After you learned about slavery, and your various original religious heritages, did you reflect on your religion at the time? To clarify, does/did the notion that Christianity may have been forced/indoctrinated into your ancestry cause reflection or turmoil?
Bonus questions: Does the notion that the New Testament condones slavery, affect you? Do you revere/follow the Old Testament even though it fortifies slavery?

I am NOT proselytizing, this is purely questioning. Please see my ep question for proof, EP Link#answer-37043843
PicklesAndPie PicklesAndPie
26-30
3 Responses Jul 26, 2015

Get thee hence, Satan:(

lol! Thanks for your..."response"? Even though it didn't answer the question at all. I guess I'll interoperate it as a "Does not know.".

You can't force religion on anybody. You either believe or don't believe. The New and Old Testament doesn't condone slavery. It accepts it as the culture that prevailed at the time.Cultures change but people don't and that is what the Testaments are about.

Thank you for responding. I stand by that I’m not proselytizing, but I was hoping to get a more rooted framework for my questions than what you gave here, so in that spirit, I’m going respond candidly to your observations below. Before you read that, I’m interested to know if my original questions apply to you? Some theist’s can be exuberant to protect their fellowships and respond without considering the demographic it was intended for. If that describes you, please disclose. If you are in fact a black American (with root’s here of course), then please expand on your answers:
Now, I agree that “You can't force religion on anybody. You either believe or don't believe.” after a certain age/enlightenment. However, the chances of you inheriting the religion of your parents/care-takers is, observably, quite high. Through serval generations of bondage and indoctrination, most naturalized American blacks were, essentially, born Christian. Today in a majority of American black communities Christianity is paramount. While one may readily observe this, I’m certain of it from research in the sociological perspective and could likely provide studies on the theory if you insist. So, my question to you was, once you were old enough to have learned about the slavery of African-American’s and how they were not originally Christians, did you reflect on your current choice of religion, or question if there was any other religion you might be interested in, or did then explore?
Now, on your statement that, “The New and Old Testament doesn't condone slavery. It accepts it as the culture that prevailed at the time.”. I must begin to assume, based on the latter half of your observations that you aren’t a fundamentalist, but take the bible’s word interpretively? If that’s the case, I’m interested to know how much you assume is absolute, do you believe in the story of Noah’s Ark for instance?
As for the first half, I must fervently disagree, and will allow the text to speak for itself: New Testament Ephesians 6:5 – “Servants, be obedient to them that are [your] masters according to the flesh, with fear and trembling, in singleness of your heart, as unto Christ.”. I find that one particularly fearful-telling a slave that they should submit to their master as they submit to Jesus, that is strong language, I hope you can agree. So, does the notion that the New Testament condones slavery effect you (not necessarily does it make you question your faith) but does it dishearten you emotionally? Old Testament Leviticus 25:44-46 – “Both thy bondmen, and thy bondmaids, which thou shalt have, [shall be] of the heathen that are round about you; of them shall ye buy bondmen and bondmaids.” This statement clearly condones the act of enslavement, by directing its readers on how/where to obtain slaves. It’s not merely acknowledging slavery but actively propagating it. So with that in mind, do you revere/follow the Old Testament even though it fortifies slavery? Many Christian’s see the OT as being outdated by the NT, so no judgment from me, I promise!
As for, “Cultures change”: yes. “people don't”: no. “that is what the Testaments are about.”: Not quite. I could go into more detail than that, but I think you get the drift. Thanks again.

Guess you are not very well read regarding history. Humanity has practiced slavery since humanity could practice slavery. The condoning of slavery in Christianity you refer to is slavery from the slave's position. Whether Christianity was forced on ones ancestors is completely irrelevant since Christianity is a personal commitment not something you inherit. BTW did you ever read how Russia became 'Christian'? The Tsar lined up the people and marched them into the river in a mass baptism.

Thank you for your response. Could you please further elaborate on this, as I did not understand it, "The condoning of slavery in Christianity you refer to is slavery from the slave's position.". I agree that "Christianity is a personal commitment" (past a certain age/enlightenment) That is why I asked, "Why do you continue to except Christianity willingly...Was this something you considered at all?" I am looking for personal opinions, insights from those who have considered these issues, not from those who may have not considered it. I did not know about Russia, thank you. I'm not sure if I would hold that to the same standard however as they were not enslaved, not sure on that-I need more research to commit.

1: The early Christians were slaves. Thus the admonition to be obedient to the slave owners was a recognition of the way things were.
2: The Russian serfs were slaves to the tsar and as such they had no choice in their 'conversion'. One of my ancestors was a Russian serf that was marched into the river. I am a Christian by God's sovereign choice not by what happened to my long dead grandparents.
3: Unless and until you become a Christian you will never understand what I am saying. Yes I am using English but I am expressing Spiritual facts that can not be understood by the unregenerate. To be kind you are on the outside looking in and can't figure it out. Become a Christian and it will be revealed to you. In the mean time please go pound sand with your liberal racism. I find it repugnant. For in Christianity there is no longer slave nor freeman, nor black nor white nor male nor female for all are one in Christ Jesus the LORD.

4. I realize that many of you have probably been proselytized by atheist’s in the past, but I find it abhorrent how readily you verbally reem someone asking genuine questions.” In the mean time please go pound sand with your liberal racism.” I swear, I might not be a Christian, but I think your Jesus would admonish you for the way you insult, accuse, and assume at people-how unchristian like.
3. And the cherry on top, “Become a Christian” well, you make it so appealing with your instant disgust of any questioning! Asking about how one’s ancestral history affect one’s faith is NOT racism. This could be asked of a Jew just the same, and I have-not that you need to know. And your second point confirms my 3rd.
2. I readily admitted that I didn’t know much about Russia, that I needed more research on the subject so come off of your high horse on that. There’s a difference between a slave and a serf, by the way.
1. While you could reasonably argue that it was written with only the consideration of Christian’s to serve a master and not the reverse, it’s difficult to confirm intentions from 2,000 years ago. I will offer that perhaps it was both ways, in that the bible is supposedly the inspired words of God, so that is how it should be taken, as an omnipotent God with a plan would have foreseen continued slavery throughout time. However, my second question is still unanswered, that would then apply to the New Testament, but not the Old, so, do you revere/follow the Old Testament even though it fortifies slavery?
Now stop accusing me of racism at every turn-you don’t even know my race. And answer the question with as much respect as I have shown you, or don’t respond at all.

Well when some humanist liberal no brain tries to incite racism all the while accusing Christians of being racist I get a little steamed. Now let us consider for a second. Christianity is not a punishment. Christianity is a world view that promotes peace and racial harmony. I have books written by family members who were the first missionaries in Africa. They describe the slave trade carried out by blacks on blacks. They write graphically about the incessant raids of one tribe or village on another. They write about how after the introduction of Christianity the raiding and murder rates dropped dramatically. They were there and these were eye witness accounts. Then you accuse the American slave owners of 'forcing' Christianity on their slaves. However you have to think of this one other way. If the greatest gift you can give is eternal life and you believe that Christianity is the only path to eternal life then introducing Christianity to your slaves is a good thing. BTW I used to be an atheist so I am more than aware of the nonsense going through your mind. Its bigotry but you are simply too blind to see it.

First, I cannot comment on missionaries in Africa. I’d have to assume that they continue to be Africans, so they wouldn’t fit into my theory-question. Although I am tempted…no, I’ll leave it-this is beginning to be a tangent, lol. Onward! “If the greatest gift you can give is eternal life and you believe that Christianity is the only path to eternal life then introducing Christianity to your slaves is a good thing.” Oh we come to it, you answered the question! THANK YOU. This was like pulling teeth, I’m so happy-I was gonna give you some more what-for about insulting me again, but frankly I’m just so glad you answered, Ima let it slide. So, you did (or perhaps have) thought about it. Interesting. You know, I figured, starting this question, that your answer would be the answer I got the MOST. Surprisingly, it’s turning out that most people never considered it but (to paraphrase) don’t care. It’s very interesting. Again, thank you, for your time and answer.

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