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A Brief Introduction

I am in my late 20s. I was raised in the UK, the Caribbean and the US, living with my family in one of those places until I gradated from university. My parents are both physicians. Of all these places, my favorite was always the Caribbean, where I spent most of my time as a child. I was heavily into sports, mostly sailing, diving and jogging, I am still very athletic, even now that I am in a wheelchair.

After I graduated from university, I took two advanced degrees, and then settled into teaching and professional wedding planning.

Because I was familiar with, and able to lawfully work in, the UK, the US and the island on which I grew up, I was able to put together a very successful high end business, which was a lot more fun than teaching!. I provided the entire wedding and honeymoon experience; the participants and guests got onto a plane in the UK or US, got off at my island, and everything was arranged for them..

Last year, I was in a car accident and my spine was severed. So now although I am completely healthy, I am a paraplegic.

The wedding planning business was just impossible from a wheelchair, for a variety of reasons ( that’s another different subject if anyone is interested), so I have gone into university teaching full time now, in Vermont.

I have only had one really serious relationship, and that ended-- completely and totally--after I was disabled. (there is another story there, too!) So now I am single.

I have always been very petite and very thin and athletic.--I have managed to keep in shape even though I am now disabled, with wheelchair racing and tennis.

I have had a deformity since puberty, so the social aspect of paraplegia was not as traumatic as it might be for someone who had always been ‘average’.

The past year in the wheelchair has been very challenging, interesting and enlightening;- for the first time in my adult life people seem to see me more as a person and less as some sort of a freak because of my deformity. I feel that I am considered more an intelligent human being and that interest is not as sexually permeated as before I was in the chair.

Questions are welcome and I will answer them completely.


Martha1982 Martha1982 26-30, F 1 Response Oct 8, 2011

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I don't think I have macromastia although I need the largest cup Elila 34N bra to comfortably contain me. My experience of having a very large bust and a disability is a little different to yours. I have cerebral palsy so have had to live with this disability since childhood. Whereas for you using a wheelchair has drawn attention away from your chest I have to contend with a large bust combined with a severe gait. I learnt when I was young to walk with a scissor gait thrusting my legs forward for each step and while this gets me around it tends to mean that I throw my chest forward and bottom backward when walking - not good for playing down the size of my assets. I've tried crutches to steady my walk but find them inconvenint because they mean my hands aren't free. I occasionally use a wheelchair but prefer to keep my legs moving for the longer term sake of my mobility. I'm sorry to hear you have no choice in the matter but thanks for sgaring your story - its an inspiration. Any thoughts about sources of good bras would be welcome as just wearing the Elila is a bit boring.