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I Am 1/8 Th Cherokee

My grandfather was full blood cherokee, I wish I knew more about him.  He died when I was about 5-6.  The sad part is not many people know that much about him.  It seems like so much history is lost.  I like to do family history and things like that.. but not much information exists.  I am very proud that I am at least a small part native american.  Does anyone else have this problem..when you are part native american what is your true name really?  My last name is assimilated. I don't know how it came into being.  I don't know if due to pressure to assimilate my ancestors just picked something or what.  I sometimes wonder what it would be like for my great grandfather to be alive so I could ask him about his life and people.  Its like a big part of me has always been missing.  I try to learn as much as I can about the people, the culture, but I live in an area where I am  there aren't many cherokee.  I am glad to have joined this community.

shadowgirl shadowgirl 26-30, F 11 Responses May 4, 2008

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I too was told my great, great grandmother was Cherokee, but how do I find out ??

As I started my family research , I knew the cherokee, we grew up in a white southern environment but had small remnants of the cherokee, certain foods, certain thinking....I've now learned that my cherokee goes in and out of my mothers line
A full blood would marry a fourth blood whose child would marry a half blood whose child would marry a full blood etc,
I would be close to half blood.....my family is not an easy one to discover due to the common white names they had such as smith or Taylor , also my family were part of the 5-8000 that left the Cherokee Nation before the march so no, they would not be on the census
I spoke with an elder of the nation years ago and explained that I personally may never prove my linage and I expressed my sadness over that
His response was one of, being cherokee is more than being a name..... Though I have connected my mothers family to its roots, my great great grandmother and grandfather came down from the nation to flee the march and try to make it on their own, they lived in a community of other Cherokees that were doing the same......
Do I look indian? If you look right, do you look indian? Do you need to be part of your tribe or nation to be who your ancestors were?
Yes it would be great,
In my case I am basically one paper away from enrollment ....I want to encourage all of those in here that truly want to reconnect with their roots, no one has the right to dictate to you who your ancestors were, mine were cherokee , my grandmother a full blood my grandfather a half blood, mine were Scottish, Clan Campbell,
Mine were Irish from county Tyronne.....let's not forget those who made our families who they are

If you are in fact cherokee then any census record before 1930 should show your great grandparents. Your family's real name is the one you have because just like freed slaves natives were assigned christian names when they were rounded up into reservations, usually the fathers name like redcloud or standalone, names were not passed down. As a full blood shoshone I would like you to know that we are not dead, your history is not lost and if you wish to claim native heritage you need to learn the culture and become involved in the culture, otherwise you are just like someone who claims a religion yet doesn't practice it. Being native isnt romantic nor does it make you a psychic or a medicine woman, it means dealing with the reality of poverty, genocide, violence and losing your children to a world that doesn't care. Go to a reservation and take a good look at what colonization has done to us and then decide if you want to keep claiming heritage, because if you do then you owe your life to your tribe and the uplifting of our people. You cant cherry pick, either you are or you're not.

Sorry I meant first names were christianized and the fathers name became the last name, sometimes families were just given a complete Christian name. In some cases when families were taken to reservations and the kids were sent to the boarding schools the teachers decided to cut their hair and change their whole name into a chriatian name like my families. These were the same schools where kids were chained to machines to work 18 hour days for free and beaten for speaking their languages. My grandpa saw a priest cut abiys foot off for trying to run away, and my dad was beaten daiky and raped because he couldnt stop speaking in shoshone to his brothers.

If you haven't already done so, contact the Family History Center in any Mormon Temple Center. The Mormon organization has compiled a history of hundreds of millions of families and have records of American Indian tribes in their archives....available for all to access for free.

I lived in Los Angeles for several years and visited the Mormon Temple Family History Center on Santa Monica Boulevard. I am not Mormon. The center is open for all to visit. The nuns who run the center live and die to help people find their relatives. Every large city has a temple and family history center. Some small, some big.....but all have access to the humongously large collection of genealogy information.

My family ancestral records were thought destroyed during the two world wars....but no. I found the records of my German and my Dutch ancestors back to the early 1600's when the Catholic records finally ran out. What I have not been able to find are the records of my Alsatian ancestors who worked for the King, and were chased from the country during the French Revolution, when their records must have been burned.

Don't be shy. I helped a lady friend find her great grand, and grandparents in the records. She is 1/2 Cherokee and 1/2 Comanche.....100% American Indian!!! I also helped a lady find her American Indian Chief grandfather in West Virginia. Good luck....have fun, it is an intoxicating adventure to search and find......A.

I don't know my exact "blood quantum" I know that some of my relatives look more Native American that folks that have a "full blood" grandparent. I also know that we have a lot of the diseases common among Native Americans-diabetes and alcoholism. My father is 88 years old-and his hair has only a little gray. I've been told this is a trait most common among Native Americans.<br />
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I didn't really look at this until my uncle participated in a medical study that showed that branch of the family had substantial Sami ancestry. The Sami are an indigenous minority in the far north of Europe. They are "white"-but their physical culture reminds me some of Inuit. Also, their blood groupings are rather atypical of any other European culture. The sami were pretty forcibly assimilated. Their history is similar to native Americans-except that it started earlier-and many people of Sami ancestry know nothing of their heritage. What I've noticed, is despite that, you see a fair number of people of Sami heritage married to people Native American or Inuit heritage.<br />
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What I've heard is a lot of land owning families in Missouri, Illinois, Indiana and Ohio are descendent from Native Americans. Basically when Europeans settled, the Natives had the choice of retaining some land but relinquishing tribal identity or being moved to Oklahoma. I grew up around a lot of folks that looked pretty native american-more so sometimes than folks I see from reservations-but many of these folks don't identify as Native American.<br />
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I think there is an interesting sociology among the descendents of recently assimilated indigeous peoples. What I see among my Sami relatives: a really serious tendency towards paranoia. They always feel like people are out to get them. When I look at the history-that is a pretty good approximation of the last 800 years of history for that group-the history got somehow internalized.

I'm in the same situation. My grandpa was 75% Cherokee, but nobody knows that much about him.

Hi. I am mollie. If your grandfather was full blooded and you can find out his parents name and their parents name then you can look on the internet at the Brady rolls. And look up and see if their names were on it. The Brady Rolls were the recorded names of the Cherokee's that walked the trail of tears and so forth. Wish I could figure some of things I want to know out also. My grandmother was 1/2 Blackfoot and 1/2 Cherokee on my mothers mothers side. My grandmother on my dads side was supposibly Blackfoot also. I am proud. My mother is thinking of going ahead and giving me an indian name. Even though I am 40 years old.

An "indian name"isnt something thats just given to you. You need to earn it. Theres a loot of ceremony and religious aspects to this , why do you people insist on bastardizing our culture you have already stolen everything else stop pretending you respect us just because you think we're dead

That's not nice
If she is looking to honor her parents people then what is that to you...,you're just spewing hate

all I could tell you to be proud who ever they where.they did some bad things. but where provoked into it.the amercian indian will always be remember as proud people.

If your grandfather was full-blood Cherokee, you are 1/4 Cherokee. My grandfather (my mother's father) was 1/2 Cherokee, so I am 1/8 Cherokee from my mother's side of the family. I am also 1/16 Cherokee from my dad's side of the family as his great grandmother was also full-blood Cherokee. I suppose that would make me 3/16 or 0.1875 which would be almost 2/8, I guess?<br />
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I, like you, feel that our family history as far as our Cherokee heritage has been lost. When I became old enough to understand, I questioned my mother as to why she did not know more about our family. She, regretfully, had never asked my grandfather about our family because as a child she was called half-breed and also ****** because of her beautiful dark skin. Something that she is very proud of now--and she would love to know about our history. My grandfather had his larynx removed because of cancer when my mom was 10. This combined with the way she was treated as a child are the main reasons she never tried to learn about our family at that time. By the time I was old enough to want to know all these things my grandfather was so old (and without vocal cords because of the cancer) it was very hard to communicate. All of his family, that I know of, is gone. He was 50 when my mother was born so much of his family had passed away before my mother reached adulthood. <br />
<br />
To me, it is a very sad situation. And my mother regrets so much that this history is lost because she never wanted to know until it was really late

If your grandfather was full-blood Cherokee, you are 1/4 Cherokee. My grandfather (my mother's father) was 1/2 Cherokee, so I am 1/8 Cherokee from my mother's side of the family. I am also 1/16 Cherokee from my dad's side of the family as his great grandmother was also full-blood Cherokee. I suppose that would make me 3/16 or 0.1875 which would be almost 2/8, I guess?<br />
<br />
I, like you, feel that our family history as far as our Cherokee heritage has been lost. When I became old enough to understand, I questioned my mother as to why she did not know more about our family. She, regretfully, had never asked my grandfather about our family because as a child she was called half-breed and also ****** because of her beautiful dark skin. Something that she is very proud of now--and she would love to know about our history. My grandfather had his larynx removed because of cancer when my mom was 10. This combined with the way she was treated as a child are the main reasons she never tried to learn about our family at that time. By the time I was old enough to want to know all these things my grandfather was so old (and without vocal cords because of the cancer) it was very hard to communicate. All of his family, that I know of, is gone. He was 50 when my mother was born so much of his family had passed away before my mother reached adulthood. <br />
<br />
To me, it is a very sad situation. And my mother regrets so much that this history is lost because she never wanted to know until it was really late

If your grandfather was full-blood Cherokee, you are 1/4 Cherokee. My grandfather (my mother's father) was 1/2 Cherokee, so I am 1/8 Cherokee from my mother's side of the family. I am also 1/16 Cherokee from my dad's side of the family as his great grandmother was also full-blood Cherokee. I suppose that would make me 3/16 or 0.1875 which would be almost 2/8, I guess?<br />
<br />
I, like you, feel that our family history as far as our Cherokee heritage has been lost. When I became old enough to understand, I questioned my mother as to why she did not know more about our family. She, regretfully, had never asked my grandfather about our family because as a child she was called half-breed and also ****** because of her beautiful dark skin. Something that she is very proud of now--and she would love to know about our history. My grandfather had his larynx removed because of cancer when my mom was 10. This combined with the way she was treated as a child are the main reasons she never tried to learn about our family at that time. By the time I was old enough to want to know all these things my grandfather was so old (and without vocal cords because of the cancer) it was very hard to communicate. All of his family, that I know of, is gone. He was 50 when my mother was born so much of his family had passed away before my mother reached adulthood. <br />
<br />
To me, it is a very sad situation. And my mother regrets so much that this history is lost because she never wanted to know until it was really late