Results Not Typical... Your Reality May Vary.

While there are distinct advantages to being able to "blend in," there are equal advantages in standing apart.  Whether it's wild hair, separatist views, passion for fashion, or just plain ol' weirdness; there's a visibility inherent in difference which sets apart the nonconformist.  While this visibility serves the purposes of expression and liberty, I believe there comes with it a responsibility I think many ignore (provided of it they're even aware).

If you think about even our modern (Industrial Revolution = modern) history, what figures prominently in our leadership; national, recreational, or corporate?  We generally remember best those who "stuck out" - the squeaky wheels and rogue, rusty nails that society oft tried to "fix" with oil or hammer.  Who was it that made the most difference in how things went, for good or ill?  I'd gamble that it was always that squeaky, rogue, rusty bugger who - at the very least - got things moving.

I've always been "different," too.  I feel like I've always treated it as a responsibility - even since I was a little kid.  My intelligence really set me apart back then (I was a gifted child, but I'm only an "above average" adult, really), and I used it to help my peers understand things.  My lack of empathy made me a fair strategist, a good middleman, and a great negotiator (read:  loved to argue a reasoned and "38 rulesworthy" argument).  My disinterest in friendship and romance made me just aloof enough to win both by default, should I have wanted them.

I have super robot toys all over my desk, desktop wallpapers of the same, and constantly carry around a sketchbook and a DS Lite (despite being [edit]nearly 30[/edit] 31).  I keep strange hours (despite my [edit]engagement[/edit] marriage to a lady who needs a more scheduled life, most days), play video games whenever I'm able, and have a NewEgg "dream machine" wishlist worth nearly $4K.  While none of this makes me really different from most "nerds" in my age group (Autobots, transform and roll out!), I think what defines me is how I use it all.  I will always have that child's viewpoint - I maintain it through a steady diet of perpetual fascination; deep, dawdling daydreams; and relentless rumination.  I can be equally amazed by quantum entanglement spin teleportation as by a tiny spider's predation of a moth; it, a megagargant by orders of magnitude.  It's the aeternal freshness of everything in my perception, permeating to the core, that sets me apart from my X-Gen peers.

I think I'm a prime example of how you can like the same things as one group yet see those things in a totally different way.  Unique perspective is part of everyone's reality (with it being completely relative, and all), but I don't think that everyone takes the time to experience their own.

Wow, long, meandering, proselytizing post.  Since I DEFINITELY don't want to be like all those OTHER grammar/construction nazis out there, I'll awkwardly leave you with one thought from one of the greatest nonconformist wackos (read:  awesomest, to the max) of all time, Dave Barry:



Boogers. ::chuckle::

NotWilliamShatner NotWilliamShatner
26-30, M
5 Responses Oct 10, 2006

U and I could break stuff, together... I am very enchanted via your mind. This is a rarity for me! Trust that! an extreme rarity......,

I want to go through this, point by point:<br />
<br />
1.) "I feel like I've always treated it as a responsibility"<br />
Let me ask, is it something you've considered to be a burden or a gift in the way of responsbility? Is it something that you willingly maintained or something that you nursed?<br />
<br />
2.) "My intelligence really set me apart back then (I was a gifted child, but I'm only an "above average" adult, really),"<br />
I would disagree with the assertion that your intelligence has declined or that you are lacking against your peers. That statement has a certain duality if you look carefully. Most adults do not write as well or thoughtfully as you do. Your grasp of the English language is clearly above average. If I were to guess, I'd estimate this was written on a 13th to 15th grade reading level.<br />
<br />
3.) "and I used it to help my peers understand things."<br />
Your peers let you?! My peers practically stoned me for using more than monosyllabic words! When report cards came out, I scrambled to hide mine as fast as I could!<br />
<br />
4.) "My lack of empathy made me a fair strategist, a good middleman, and a great negotiator (read: loved to argue a reasoned and "38 rulesworthy" argument)."<br />
Empathy is not a detrimental emotion. If you were actually devoid of empathy, I would be more concerned that you were sociopathic and manipulative as a result. Somehow, I doubt that. But then again, how well can one person know another through one essay? However, I believe it's having higher logic that translates empathy into something more useful than being swayed by the sympathetic emotion that is a result. It seems that is how it works, because if you had no empathy at all, then you would have no interest in other people's affairs unless it directly pertained to your gain.<br />
<br />
5.) "My disinterest in friendship and romance made me just aloof enough to win both by default, should I have wanted them."<br />
It's a curious thing, aloofness. How is it that being detatched is an attractive quality? I've noticed it is. Maybe it's because people consider it mysterious, and most people cannot handle mystery. It's either curiousity or fear that drives them to take an interest and unravel the mystery.<br />
But the biggest question is this. What prompts the disinterest? Really, psychologically, it's against human nature. Humans are social creatures, like most mammals. We typically live in groups and seek companionship.

extremely interesting point of view

Boogers...HA!!

except for the fact that I needed a dictionary for almost every word, that was an awesome read. makes all this idling on the computer worthwhile:)