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Proof That Americans Do Not See the Homeless As Human!

For anyone that doesn't understand the reality of homelessness in American--mainly how so-called civilized people treat those less fortunate than them, here's the reality, the concrete proof!

God bless America? Ha! I don't think so!

Too many Americans simply lack the courage to care--because Americans are lazy and caring not only takes courage--it takes a little effort, as well.

The homeless mostly go uncounted. A homeless man, not so long ago, who was dying, was not only kicked out of the ER he went to for not having the ability to pay for his care--he was driven to an alley, and abandoned there--by the hospital! This is a TRUE story! It happened in AMERICA. Literally millions die in this country each year from poverty and neglect, and NO ONE cares. It could be stopped....but no one wants to be bothered. We throw away billions on Iraq, because...why? Iraquis were being killed? Millions of Americans die--because we don't want to spend money on NHS, and NO ONE cares! Let 'em die, throw 'em away, they don't fit our image. They aren't human anymore because they aren't successful, or mentally stable, or young and trendy, or whatever...

God bless America my arse.

Here's an editorial article from the L.A. Times:

A police state on skid row The LAPD is again rousting and searching homeless people without cause. By Ramona Ripston, RAMONA RIPSTON is executive director of the ACLU of Southern California.
March 12, 2007
THE LOS ANGELES Police Department has a message for skid row residents: The 4th Amendment doesn't apply here. That's the constitutional protection from arbitrary searches, and L.A. police officers have been violating it since late last year by detaining, handcuffing and going through people's pockets and possessions on the slimmest pretenses.

Cecil Bledsoe is a 65-year-old African American man who was once homeless and now works as a counselor helping others find housing. He was on his way to the bus in December when a police car rolled up and officers ordered him against a wall, then searched and questioned him. Bledsoe was released because he had done nothing wrong.

Police are also detaining homeless people for minor infractions such as jaywalking or sitting on the sidewalk, then using those pretexts as a basis to search them. Shawn Robertson was packing up his belongings one morning last November when police stood him against a wall and handcuffed him. They searched his stuff, ran his name, then let him go.

Paul Johnson was searched in December by officers who told him that "everybody down here is on probation or parole." Johnson isn't. The police officer who stopped him later admitted that he could not offer a reason for the search.

These aren't the hard-core criminals police promised to round up when the LAPD assigned 50 more officers to skid row last September. They're ordinary people whose only mistake was being homeless in the wrong part of town.

City leaders promised that the new officers would be part of a strategy to solve the homeless problem that included housing and services. Instead, the city has done exactly what everyone said it should not do: send police out as its primary tool. We're seeing the inevitable result.

We've been here before. Twenty years ago, the city and civil rights groups agreed that police were going too far on skid row by trashing residents' belongings in twice-daily sweeps. "It would appear that we have miraculously solved the horrible problem of destitute homelessness in our community by simply declaring it illegal," actor Martin Sheen wrote in The Times that year.

Since then, we've been caught in a disturbing cycle, with police abusing their power and then being challenged in court, only to either back down or be nudged into compliance by the courts.

Three years ago, a federal judge found that police were conducting arbitrary searches in the 50-square-block skid row area of L.A. and stopped them. The ACLU of Southern California and civil rights attorneys have filed a motion to extend that injunction.

The police shouldn't need a judge's order to know that this kind of activity is unlawful. The Bill of Rights has a nearly 220-year-old prohibition against "unreasonable searches."

New York started to reduce homelessness only when it decided that an enforcement-only approach to the problem was inefficient and expensive. A 2004 study on the costs of homeless services in the U.S. shows that jails and prison are twice as expensive as housing and shelter. L.A.'s leaders say the police are stretched too thin, yet they seem to have deep pockets for skid row police and prosecutors while always coming up short for housing.

Some say aggressive policing is working. Today, skid row's streets are strangely empty, as if hundreds of people who just months ago crowded the area's alleys every night have disappeared. Where have they gone? Some are in jail where they belong. A handful are in pretrial diversion programs where they can get the help they need. The vast majority have likely moved — to Hollywood, the Valley or Venice. These places have fewer services that the homeless need. When this crackdown ends, they'll be back.

We know where they haven't gone: into housing that's connected to services such as mental health care and job training, the only solution we know works. Meanwhile, constant police searches have added to the burdens of those who are seeking help for mental illness and addiction in skid row and complicated the efforts of those who would help them.

"The fear and stress people feel from interactions with the police add significantly to their issues," Casey Horan, executive director of Lamp Community, a homeless services provider, said in a statement the ACLU filed with the court. "When people are subject to aggressive policing, it makes outreach more difficult."

ADDENDUM:

Methinks "happy hooker" is very young and has yet to be up the creek and over the mountain. What makes her think that I HAVEN'T helped the homeless in my lifetime? What the hell makes her think I don't care about others---is that the impression I'm giving? Damn. I'm not a person who sits and whines idly--I am a person who is NOT afraid to take the bull by the horns and get the job done--no matter how unpleasant. It's when I have my hands tied, so to speak--like right now--that frustrates and angers me.

Don't assume things about people you don't know! I was "helping" when she wasn't even a gleam in her mum and dad's eye. I've helped before, and I'd help again--if I was in a position to do so.

 Unfortunately, I'm having all I can do just to wake up in the morning, shower and go out to work---I'm having all I can do right now, not to get suicidal--I think trying to convince myself to stay alive, is just a tiny bit more of a priority, right now.

I don't want to discourage people from commenting on my blogs--and certainly everyone's entitled to his or her opinion. Especially if it's one that shows some thought and/or empathy.

All I can say HH, is that I wonder if you've ever held the hand of the person you loved the most in the entire planet, and watched them stop breathing forever? I wonder how you would have handled having to tell the doctor to end the life one person you love the most--and then had to sit alone in a room and watch the life leave that person. And then, after, lose your home, lose most of your possessions, watch the future you so carefully planned--and worked 7 days a week for, for over 5 years--just get flushed down the toilet. I wonder how you would deal with losing your place to live twice in one year. How you would deal with having to put four cats--two that you had for 17 years and loved dearly--the last vestage of your "family," having to put them to sleep, because you couldn't keep them. How you would handle being TOTALLY alone--24/7--no friends, no family, no peers--NOTHING. How would you handle being physically disabled and losing your only transport--when you live 3 miles from the nearest town? And lets not forget losing 2 jobs as well---and having ALL this happen in the space of one short year!

If you've read the above, and still remain clueless on why homelessness distresses me--then you are totally incapable of truly understanding anything I have to say, sadly.

No offence kiddo,  I do  appreciate the imput, but you simply don't know whereof you speak.


whovian whovian 46-50, F 9 Responses Mar 19, 2007

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Its a tribal problem... you know, presumably if you have a place to have sex, you have a place to raise your baby, and you stop your baby from having sex or you push them away. Well, that's never been easy. In the old days we slept in long houses and had clearly defined working roles and systems of gratitude and attainment that got us comforts, companionship, common goals and meaningful lives. <br />
its so go it alone now... and in the warm winter cities the rich have such gates.... its a shame the quantity of pushed aways who never learn to submit to natures basic laws of reap and sow.

I was homeless just 2 weeks ago, and I was doing fine until some buttclown pulled out in front of me, causing me to hit him, and totalling the Nissan Pathfinder I was living in, I would killtime thru the day, and then I had a place where I could sleeo on the beach(I was in Florida) and I was almost back to the point of having enough money for shelter, and then the one thing I couldn't afford to happen, happened, and then I was really screwed. I sat on the curb after the wreck and cried my eyes out, I had worked so hard, and waited so long to get back to Florida, just to see it all go down the drain. I seriously considered just walking out to the gulf, taking a swim, and never coming back, but one of the volenteer Police workers took pity on me, and let me stay with him for a week til I could afford a place again. What added insult to injury(nothing physical on me) was that the insurance company paid off, and I couldn't find my Title anywhere to release the car for settlement, so at the moment of this writing, I'm staying at Moms place once again, truing to get my act, and life back together. Good Luck, it's what you need at a time like this.

YOUR government CHOOSES to spend money on foreign countries and complain about human rights issues in other lands.....<br />
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I'm so grateful to be living in Australia with a home and free medical

YESSSSSSSSSSSS . I have a friend in S.A. there and HE said, once I described what a hurting citizen CAN or cannot ACCESS in the states IN THE "BEST of TIMES"....."I'll complain no more; I'm grateful I live here (Australia)" ;)

I think the harsh truth is that the government and various rich big shots are covering these things up through instilling fear into the ones involved in order to keep the rest of the public unaware of what they are doing.<br />
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1942 - just because we have the news doesn't mean they can't do it

the tide can turn on anyone so remember to always treat people with the respect, kindness and empathy that yu would wish upon yourself............people with mental health issues make up the highest percentage of homelessness....<br />
Im so lucky that I have a roof over my head although I dont own it..so what...........Im grateful.

Muffinman, THIS is why I stopped using this website, 'cos there's to many empty mindless morons like yourself on here. <br />
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That is the DUMBEST think I've EVER heard anyone say. You voted for George W. Bush, didn't you. <br />
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Sunshine, I was homeless for a month, I would literally rather be DEAD than homeless! I do not, did not, don't ever want to be, homeless. <br />
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You are made of cardboard is you believe that women and children deliberately choose to starve and freeze. <br />
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I feel sorry for you, you have no heart and no mind, no spirit and no soul. You are an automaton, you sir, are a COWARD. Even, I daresay, a ZERO.<br />
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It takes courage to care, sunshine, it takes zero to make remarks like yours.

way to go ! I have a relative who lives under a bridge a sweet loving man that couldn't take life anymore.Despite the families attempts to help him- witch he has refused he collects cans for a living and stays in the street. I can not believe how people look down upon those less fortunate than themselves. But for the grace of god,there go you. Yes, i also fight for others . Keep fighting

So wht don't you lead by example and bring a few homeless into your home?<br />
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I have BEEN homeless. I didnt feel like less of a person. I felt more tru and real during that experience than i have in my entire life. i learned to separate myself from the ridiculousness of American greed and want. I learned to look at people as people, not judge them by the money they do or do not have, not the clothes they wear or places they eat.<br />
The fact that you have even taken the time to write this shows that YOU consider the homeless to be lesser persons-- people who need to be defeded and taken up for by random folks behind their comouter, presumably in a house (or at least building) and feeling rather self righteous. <br />
If homelessness and the treatment of the homeless is such an issue to you,t hen I suggest you step away from the computer, volunteer in a soup kitchen and meet some homeless.<br />
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they do not want to be felt sorry for.<br />
they do not want or need you blogging about them. <br />
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i think all of this goes back to your extreme dislike for America and its culture and society, which is really too bad. Nothing will change if you don't change it.

me too..i was temporarily homeless on and off for about a year. i learned a hell of alot and it made me stronger as well as helped me set my real priorities/values in this life. so much of what i had thought was priority/important many years prior are not. i also witnessed, experienced how most of our greedy selfish society does NOT help the homeless. especially "the advertised" homeless outreach programs . both state and county wide. must have something to do with some crooked politicians..each and EVERY one, made it sound so easy, so easy to recieve some kind of decent help/aide and theyre all full of ****. especially the churches. bunch of damn liars. ive got no respect at all left for washington, the state i live in and or churches. i realized the only person i could depend on through thick and thin is "ME". yep..thats it. pretty sad. im no longer homeless, still work the same job caring for seniors that are sick. i still contribute what i can to my fellow human even tho noone contributed to me when i was in need.

So wht don't you lead by example and bring a few homeless into your home?<br />
<br />
I have BEEN homeless. I didnt feel like less of a person. I felt more tru and real during that experience than i have in my entire life. i learned to separate myself from the ridiculousness of American greed and want. I learned to look at people as people, not judge them by the money they do or do not have, not the clothes they wear or places they eat.<br />
The fact that you have even taken the time to write this shows that YOU consider the homeless to be lesser persons-- people who need to be defeded and taken up for by random folks behind their comouter, presumably in a house (or at least building) and feeling rather self righteous. <br />
If homelessness and the treatment of the homeless is such an issue to you,t hen I suggest you step away from the computer, volunteer in a soup kitchen and meet some homeless.<br />
<br />
they do not want to be felt sorry for.<br />
they do not want or need you blogging about them. <br />
<br />
i think all of this goes back to your extreme dislike for America and its culture and society, which is really too bad. Nothing will change if you don't change it.