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Security Camera Law
Legal issues

The right to privacy, although not explicitly protected by the Constitution, is of paramount importance to Americans - both in the way it affects our "private" lives and our "public" behavior. But, what about the use of security cameras - are there any laws in America that regulate the use of security cameras?
Public Security Camera Laws

In short, there is little or no federal regulation regarding the use of security cameras in public places. As such, any security camera used in your place of work, whether or not you know about its installation, is probably going to be okay; provided that it can be shown that the security camera was installed for "safety purposes", and that no invasion of privacy issue is in question.

That said, a number of states have now introduced regulations which prohibit the use of a security camera in a "private place" - which means a place where someone may reasonably expect to be safe from any unauthorized surveillance, even if these may be in "public areas": in particular, hidden cameras in locker rooms or restrooms.

Keep in mind though that even in those states where there is some minimal regulation regarding the use of security cameras in public places, any breach of these laws usually amounts to a misdemeanor, with a fine.
Private Security Camera Laws

In short, there is nothing to stop you installing security cameras in your home, nor are you required to inform others of the fact that security cameras have been installed. That said, keep in mind that if you place the security camera in a place where someone may otherwise believe they would have been entitled to "privacy", such as the bathroom of your home, then you may find that you are in breach of their right to privacy if you cannot later establish that you employed the use of these security cameras for safety purposes.
Complaining About Security Camera Use

With no federal laws directly regulating the use of security cameras, and little state laws regulating the use, in the event that you would like to complain about someone else's over zealous use of a security camera then you are going to need to rely on other laws already in place. Unfortunately, not only are there few of these, for example there is no labor protection laws regulating the use of security cameras in the workplace, but what laws there are have so far been interpreted in various different ways. All of this has lead to confusion about regulating the use of security camera in America today.
Possible Future Legislation?

Following 9/11 it certainly seems that there is no rush to legislate for the use of security cameras - either in public, such as your office, or in private, such as your home. Indeed, the one and only time Congress has considered legislating for security camera use, the legislation was stalled and eventually went away!
Conclusion:

Taking into account the above, everyone walking around America today should do so with the caveat that at any particular time and in any particular place, they may well be being watched on a security surveillance camera!

See also: Home Security
Demigiozia Demigiozia
70+
10 Responses Jul 31, 2010

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http://www.safetybasement.com/Security-camera-resources-and-information-s/385.htm<br />
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Retaliatory evictions are also illegal. A landlord may not terminate a tenancy or increase rent or change other terms of the rental agreement to retaliate against a tenant who asserts his or her rights under the Landlord-Tenant Act or reports violations of housing codes or ordinances.

http://www.wsba.org/media/publications/pamphlets/landlord-tenant.htm<br />
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Right of Entry<br />
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In general, with tenant consent, a landlord has a right of entry to inspect the premises; make repairs; supply necessary or agreed services; or show the property to potential tenants, purchasers or contractors. Entry is limited to reasonable times, and two days' notice of intent to enter is required. A landlord may enter the premises without the tenant's consent if an emergency or abandonment occurs, or if the landlord obtains a court order. <br />
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A landlord may not abuse his or her right of access to the premises to harass a tenant.

Discrimination by landlords<br />
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Landlords cannot refuse to sell, rent, sublease or otherwise make housing available based on a renter's race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin.<br />
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Landlords also cannot charge some individuals higher rent or falsely state that housing is not available for discriminatory reasons. However, there are some exceptions to these rules.<br />
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If you believe you have been a victim of housing discrimination, contact one of these agencies:<br />
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* Missouri Human Rights Commission<br />
Jefferson City area: 573-751-3325<br />
St. Louis area: 314-340-7590<br />
* U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development<br />
Housing Discrimination Hotline: 800-669-9777<br />
* Metropolitan St. Louis Equal Housing Opportunity Council<br />
For residents of St. Louis city, and St. Louis, St. Charles, Franklin and Jefferson counties: 314-534-5800 or 800-555-3951

http://laws.uslandlord.com/laws/mostatelaw2.html<br />
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TITLE XXIX<br />
OWNERSHIP AND CONVEYANCE OF PROPERTY<br />
Chapter 441<br />
Landlord and Tenant<br />
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THERE IS GREAT NEED TO HOLD CORRUPT MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTABLE<br />
AND <br />
TO IMMEDIATELY ARREST AND DETAIN PREDATORY MANAGERS FOR DURESS OF TENANTS<br />
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DISABLED AND OR OTHERWISE TENANTS RIGHTS<br />
TO PEACE<br />
TO NOT ENDURE HARASSMENT<br />
TO HAVE A RESIDENCE WITHOUT Second Hand SMOKE INTRUDING ON TENANT of others IN BUILDING AND OR OF Management themselves<br />
TO HAVE A RESIDENCE FREE OF NOISE POLLUTION: THE RESIDENCE SHOULD PREVENT THE TENANT FROM BEING INTRUDED UPON WITH OTHER TENANTS CONVERSATIONS THROUGH FAULTY MANAGEMENT AND OR OWNER NEGLECT OF THE BUILDING!<br />
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and there ARE many other CODE and HEALTH CODE instruments of LAW<br />
WHICH ARE IN PLACE<br />
AND OTHERS DESERVING TO BE OF IMMEDIACY IN PLACE!!!<br />
TO PROTECT DISABLED TENANTS AS WELL AS OTHER TENANTS ...<br />
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MANAGERS SHOULD BE HELD TO OBEY DRUG TESTING AS MANAGERS<br />
to PROVE THEIR CAPACITY TO PROVIDE RIGHT CONDUCT TO ALL TENANTS!<br />
AMONG OTHER IMMEDIATE IMPROVEMENTS LONG OVER DUE!!!

Missouri Landlord Tenant Law<br />
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Fair Housing Agency:<br />
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Commission for Human Rights<br />
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3315 West Truman<br />
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Jefferson City, MO 65102<br />
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(314) 751-3325<br />
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Notice of Entry: No Statute<br />
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Lease Termination: 30 Days (Missouri Ann. Stat.§ 441.060)<br />
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Security Deposit: Must be returned within 30 days<br />
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Consumer Protection Office: <br />
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Office of the Attorney General<br />
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Consumer Protection Division <br />
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P.O. Box 899<br />
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Jefferson City , MO 65102<br />
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(314) 751-3321<br />
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(800)392-8222

http://www.safetybasement.com/Security-camera-resources-and-information-s/385.htm<br />
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What are the laws on surveillance<br />
Home Surveillance/Nanny Surveillance<br />
Business Surveillance<br />
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Note: Inspite of the information we are providing here, we still advise that you check with your local laws. The information we provide below is a general reference and not a final translation of your state and local laws.<br />
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Some General Guidelines on video surveillance<br />
In general, most video recordings are legal in the U.S. with or without consent. Laws do exist regarding "Invasion of Privacy" which deals with the area of expected privacy. These include areas such as bathrooms, locker rooms, changing/dressing rooms, bedrooms and other areas where a person should expect a high level of personal privacy.<br />
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While the majority of laws dealing with video recording privacy issues tend to allow surreptitious recording and monitoring of video activity under most circumstances without notification of any of the parties involved, it is highly recommended that you consult with your local or state law enforcement or an attorney who specializes in this area to comply with all local and regulations prior to utilization of video surveillance and monitoring.<br />
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Your private investigator is well versed in such laws and as a rule of thumb; you should not have to worry about this when hiring a professional investigator. Nonetheless, this may affect your case in some ways. It is important that you realize that unlike Hollywood's version of spousal surveillance, Private investigators will not peek into windows, hide in the bathroom, put a micro-camera under the door, etc. They will NOT plant hidden cameras in cars, bed rooms or other places either.<br />
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Hidden Camera Laws<br />
The laws of 13 states expressly prohibit the unauthorized installation or use of cameras in private places. A private place is one where a person may reasonably expect to be safe from unauthorized surveillance, locker rooms, restrooms etc. Several states have laws prohibiting the use of hidden cameras in only certain circumstances, such as in locker rooms or restrooms, or for the purpose of viewing a person in a state of partial or full nudity.<br />
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Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Michagin, Minnesota, South Dakota, and Utah also prohibit trespassing on private property to conduct surveillance of people there.<br />
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In Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, Georgia, Hawaii, Kansas, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, New Hampshire, South Dakota, and Utah, installation or use of any device for photographing, observing or overhearing events or sounds in a private place without permission of the people photographed or observed is against the law.<br />
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Covert video surveillance is illegal when:<br />
The subject has a reasonable expectation of privacy (4th Amendment rights) i.e. in a bathroom; motel room; changing room<br />
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If audio eavesdropping is also taking place, covert surveillance may be illegal when:<br />
The person with authority over the premises has not consented<br />
The reason for the video surveillance fosters an illegal purpose<br />
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Audio Recording with Surveillance Cameras<br />
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The Privacy Rights Clearinghouse, say that the law concerning recording of conversations is not "settled" yet, because the technology is so new, there is a patchwork of federal, state, and local laws governing the manufacture, sale, transport, and use of video and audio recording devices. The patchwork is complex because the federal laws don’t pre-empt the local ones. So your local jurisdiction could make a law more stringent than the federal one, or the state one. Each jurisdiction is so different.<br />
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Very often, the audio picked up by a video camera is covered by the same laws as wiretapping and eavesdropping. Those laws vary by state.<br />
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There is a general rule, however, that applies to the kind of conversations a business security camera or nanny-cam would pick up.<br />
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"Regardless of the state, it is almost always illegal to record a conversation to which you are not a party, do not have consent to tape, and could not naturally overhear."<br />
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This is pretty much the definition of "eavesdropping" and is according to: The Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press<br />
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The RCFP has a very helpful summary of each State’s eavesdropping and wiretapping laws.<br />
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We hope this has been helpful, each of us are, in the end, responsible to supply information regarding video and recording laws, but as was stated there are so many grey areas that you should also consult a lawyer, as well as the local authorities in the specific areas you intend to use the devices.<br />
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As listed above the general rule of thumb is still the simple answer:<br />
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"Regardless of the state, it is almost always illegal to record a conversation to which you are not a party, do not have consent to tape, and could not naturally overhear."<br />
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References:<br />
www.wecusurveillance.com<br />
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