Unless...

Unless they start teaching all the other fairy tales with all seriousness. '

Who would seriously advocate creationism?

I mean come ON!

Teaching is supposed to be based on fact, and on preparing minds to negotiate the world around them. All creationism can teach the world is how to accept complete fallacies without question.

It makes me cringe.

Cm

chairmanmeow chairmanmeow
22-25, F
6 Responses Feb 28, 2009

While I respect and understand your opinions regarding creationism and religion in general, I think you may be oversimplifying the matter without giving it enough serious fact. Creationism is, when you break it down to what it really is, something that can neither be disproven nor proven. Personally, I see much more evidence in the world around us than against the argument for creationism; that is to say, I see plenty of evidence all around us to support one of any number of theories on the creation of the universe, but I ba<x>se that off of things that most people would not normally see or be willing to consider. My own beliefs aside, please inform me more of yours. What solid, concrete evidence do you see in the world that argues the case against creationism? Please tell me what you think, and I will gladly consider it.<br />
<br />
One other thing: You mentioned that teaching should be ba<x>sed entirely off of facts. As a member in a whole family of teachers and mentors, I can attest that this is not true. The idea of teaching is to inform those around us with knowledge which we have gained, right? If so, then you would eventually run into the problem of not knowing everything that needs to be taught. This is a simple principle of human nature. If we are to teach those around us, then we need to learn those things ourselves. But in order to learn anything and successfully pass it on, we cannot simply shun out something because of what we do or do not believe; No, in order to be truly effective teachers, we need to be open-minded to ALL possibilities, especially in matters like this, so that those we are teaching have a thorough understanding of the world and can come to their own conclusions. It is for that reason that I believe that we cannot simply NOT teach creationism. People need to hear things from a variety of sources in order to have thorough understanding. That's why I think it is much more important to at least teach creationism and everything else not as a set-in-stone matter of fact, but as a considerable possibility. If we can at least present them with the information to consider, then they can come to their own conclusions as to what they believe or not. Failing to present all possible arguments and possibilities is what truly gets us nowhere in the end, NOT teaching "fairy tales" to the next generation.

While I respect and understand your opinions regarding creationism and religion in general, I think you may be oversimplifying the matter without giving it enough serious fact. Creationism is, when you break it down to what it really is, something that can neither be disproven nor proven. Personally, I see much more evidence in the world around us than against the argument for creationism; that is to say, I see plenty of evidence all around us to support one of any number of theories on the creation of the universe, but I ba<x>se that off of things that most people would not normally see or be willing to consider. My own beliefs aside, please inform me more of yours. What solid, concrete evidence do you see in the world that argues the case against creationism? Please tell me what you think, and I will gladly consider it.<br />
<br />
One other thing: You mentioned that teaching should be ba<x>sed entirely off of facts. As a member in a whole family of teachers and mentors, I can attest that this is not true. The idea of teaching is to inform those around us with knowledge which we have gained, right? If so, then you would eventually run into the problem of not knowing everything that needs to be taught. This is a simple principle of human nature. If we are to teach those around us, then we need to learn those things ourselves. But in order to learn anything and successfully pass it on, we cannot simply shun out something because of what we do or do not believe; No, in order to be truly effective teachers, we need to be open-minded to ALL possibilities, especially in matters like this, so that those we are teaching have a thorough understanding of the world and can come to their own conclusions. It is for that reason that I believe that we cannot simply NOT teach creationism. People need to hear things from a variety of sources in order to have thorough understanding. That's why I think it is much more important to at least teach creationism and everything else not as a set-in-stone matter of fact, but as a considerable possibility. If we can at least present them with the information to consider, then they can come to their own conclusions as to what they believe or not. Failing to present all possible arguments and possibilities is what truly gets us nowhere in the end, NOT teaching "fairy tales" to the next generation.

If you expose students to just a handful of the major religions and point out how they make incompatible claims and all have the same types of "evidence" (meaning none) then kids will see that there's no way a reasonable person should willfully choose 1 to believe in over the rest. <br />
<br />
I dismiss people's religion for the same reasons they dismiss all others besides their own. It's not my fault that they don't look at their own religion as critically as they look at others. It's kind of cute to see a deeply religious Christian, for example, dismiss Muslims or Mormons or Scientologists for what those people believe, but they never realize their beliefs are equally unjustified.

LOL,<br />
Maybe that kind of school should focus on teaching religiously handicapped people to integrate with the rest of us?<br />
<br />
Cm

Amen!<br />
<br />
So to speak.<br />
<br />
:)

I just posted a Sam Harris vid on my blog on the disconnect between modern science and faith.